Gender Equality: How to Create a Win-Win in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, March 13, 2019

It can seem unbelievable that gender inequality persists in Australian workplaces in 2019. As well as the obvious human rights issues, some employers and managers fail to comprehend that a lack of gender equality can have measurable negative consequences for the organisation as a whole. 

Let's examine some of the alarming statistics around the situation for women in the workplace, the benefits of championing gender equality, and some of the more positive approaches that can be taken by organisations to create a win-win situation.

inequality - some sobering statistics

To fully understand gender inequality in Australian workplaces, it can help to absorb some of the bald statistics. Women across the Australian workforce are paid 15.3% less than men for equivalent work, and accumulate less than half the superannuation. They have a 50% chance of experiencing sexual harassment in the workplace, and the same odds of experiencing discrimination on the basis of being a parent! 

Barriers to gender equality in the workplace can be both subtle and not-so-subtle. Positional bias and diminished responsibility stem from the idea that only one gender or the other is 'right' for a job, such as reception work or heavy lifting. Subtler barriers see women being asked about family issues at job interviews - and yet not men. 

Other barriers include a lack of targeted support to help women overcome the promotional glass ceiling. For example, if the ability to act in higher positions, attend training or to network with stakeholders is not made sufficiently flexible for women in the workplace, then that glass ceiling will undoubtedly stay firmly in place.

WHy it's vital to rectify workplace gender inequality 

As indicated, these practices of gender inequality are deeply unacceptable on human rights grounds alone. Yet there is also a strong business case to be made for rectifying this situation and making gender equality a key component of business-as-usual. 

Firstly, fostering a level playing field in the workplace creates a sense of certainty and loyalty among all staff. The subsequent improvement in staff retention reduces the costs and inconvenience of rehiring and retraining. It also creates a more harmonious corporate environment due to reduced staffing changes. 

And - as if these benefits to business weren't enough - workplace gender equality enables longitudinal corporate knowledge to be more easily captured and retained. 

devEloping a high-quality business reputation

Reputational benefits also flow to those organisations that actively embrace equality for women in the workplace. For example, the prestigious Employer of Choice Awards in Australia recognises and promotes businesses that demonstrate practical gains in workplace gender equality. Reputational gains lead to the attraction and retention of high quality staff. 

fostering gender equality in your workplace

Many organisations have the best of intentions when it comes to improving gender equality. However sometimes it can be challenging to know where to start. A workplace audit of current equality initiatives can help to pinpoint any gaps - particularly between lip service and actual practice. From here, robust policies for parental leave and support, career assistance and flexible work arrangements can form an excellent base for the improvement of workplace gender equality on the ground. 

A strong framework for workplace gender equality

Being a leader in workplace gender equality brings considerable gains in employee satisfaction, reputation and the bottom line. It also works to lessen the chances of expensive claims being made on the basis of alleged gender discrimination. 

At WISE Workplace, we pride ourselves on the assistance that we provide to employers in their pursuit of excellence. We have the experience and governance expertise to help organisations remedy risks and work towards excellence in workplace gender equality. Get in touch if you would like to discuss the best ways to create equality in the workplace for women - and indeed for all employees.

Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Organisations are no doubt aware of the need to comply with anti-discrimination legislation, but actively encouraging cultural diversity in the workplace is becoming increasingly important - it can offer potential benefits far beyond simple compliance with the law. 

Let's take a look at some of the benefits, and how organisations can manage cultural diversity. 

THE definition of cultural diversity

According to Diversity Council Australia, cultural diversity is "the variation between people in terms of how they identify on a range of dimensions, including ancestry, ethnicity, ethno-religiosity, language, national origin, race and/or religion".  

Having a culturally diverse workplace simply means that you employ staff with a range of different backgrounds.

why is cultural diversity important?

Staff members from a variety of cultures offer different perspectives, knowledge and experience, which can be very valuable to organisations. 

Some of the benefits of cultural diversity include:

  • Thanks to the internet, many businesses now have clients spread out across the globe. Having a culturally diverse staff can help facilitate stronger relationships with these clients, potentially providing a competitive advantage and even boosting market share. 
  • Having a variety of different backgrounds and experiences in your workforce can encourage innovation and 'out of the box' creative thinking and decision making. 
  • Fostering a tolerant, inclusive workplace is important from an employee point of view - staff are likely to be happier and more productive working in an environment where it is clear that everyone is respected for their differences.
  • A diverse and inclusive workplace can also help attract and retain top talent. 

So how can organisations manage diversity?

 Some tips for managing diversity include:

  • Celebrating regular diversity days to recognise and support differences in your employees. However, it is important to be aware of cultural sensitivities, and avoid the appearance of tokenism. 
  • Creating policies that support an inclusive environment for people from a range of cultural backgrounds and set out what behaviour will be regarded as discriminatory or prejudiced. 
  • Communicating these policies to all staff members.
  • Imposing penalties in circumstances where inclusion policies are not being followed. 
  • Making sure that those in management positions set a good example for inclusive behaviour.
  • Being clear about what each staff member is accountable for, so everyone is treated fairly. 
  • Offering all staff training in cultural awareness and understanding. This could take the form of seminars or workshops, and perhaps including first-hand accounts of what it's like to be from a particular cultural background. 
  • Ensuring that the business has some flexibility to fit in with cultural needs. For example, a business with a high number of Muslim employees may wish to offer a prayer room, or those with Indigenous members of staff may wish to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land prior to formal meetings or events. 
  • Being flexible enough to allow employees from different backgrounds to take time away for important religious and cultural rites.

Research has found that business performance improves when employees feel highly included and think their workplace is strongly committed to supporting diversity. 

If your workplace is having issues with managing diversity, WISE Workplace provides a number of services to assist you, including cultural surveys and mediation.