Managing Complaints - How To Find The Positive

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, June 13, 2018

When an employee complaint alleging workplace discrimination or harassment is lodged, it is usually seen as a negative moment in the life of the organisation.

However, it is possible for an employer to view this as a positive phenomenon, rather than a sign of complete failure. This is because well-handled complaints can illuminate hidden corporate weaknesses, as well as any lurking issues affecting staff morale or motivation. Such information can become a valuable catalyst for positive change across the broader business - a win-win for internal and external stakeholders alike.

Best-practice in complaints handling is dependent upon a structured complaints process that includes two key ingredients: the quality of investigation process and the structure of the complaints process itself.

1. A thorough high-quality workplace investigation is an essential tool in the management of internal complaints, including allegations of discrimination and harassment.

2. The structural framework of internal complaints policies and procedures will necessarily be clear, accessible and well-publicised. A well-managed complaint can be a good news story not only for the people involved, but for the broader success of the business.

INVESTIGATING DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT 

When an employee complains that they have been the subject of discrimination or harassment, it is highly likely that there will be differing opinions and perspectives as to whether or not this is actually the case.

As a result, best-practice workplace investigation requires fair, open and even-handed treatment of all who are involved in the investigative process. Further, it is important for investigators to move at a reasonable and logical pace, first making preliminary enquiries before deciding on any next steps.

But what does a good investigation mean on the ground? One key concept is procedural fairness. This means that parties involved are equally able to access the process, to be heard in a substantive way and to be given a fair opportunity to understand and respond adequately to any claims made against them. Under procedural fairness parties have the right to an impartial decision-maker and to having a support person present during their interview. Professional investigators must be seen to be unbiased in every phase of the workplace investigation.

Added to this, a high-quality workplace investigation will ensure that all relevant and reliable evidence has been carefully obtained, anaylsed and included appropriately in the final report. There can be no room for short cuts or preferential treatment in workplace investigations.       

Robust complaints policies and procedures

Employers, investigators, complainants and witnesses alike should ideally all have access to a durable set of internal policies and procedures covering common areas of complaint.

A strong policy document detailing how and to whom to make a complaint should be accessible, user-friendly and up-to-date. The policy should also direct the reader to one or more procedures that need to be followed in the event that an alleged instance of harassment or discrimination has occurred. This is often a time of great stress, and instructions to complainants should be clear and helpful.

Internal policies and procedures that are complicated, badly written or tucked away in a dusty filing cabinet are of little-to-no assistance to the individual seeking to make a complaint.

This is why good investigations and good complaints policies go hand-in-hand: even the best investigator will struggle to keep things fair if complaints policies are convoluted or absent, or if procedures leading up to the investigation are sub-optimal.

Perhaps most importantly, managers and employees should be trained in practically accessing and using these documents, at all stages being assured that complaints are taken seriously and are indeed welcomed by the organisation.

Step by step pathways

A sound complaints process begins with employees first being made aware of a useable and fair pathway for their grievance. A good internal complaints system will work step-by-step through a logical process. This means initially providing clear and succinct information on the nature of common complaints, some definitions where appropriate, the bigger picture of the complaints process and - perhaps most importantly - who to speak with in the first instance about the particular concern.

An internal complaint is a golden opportunity for employers to gain important information about people and workplaces. For this reason, the internal complaints system should be presented in a simple, cordial and helpful format.

Problems arise every day that require the existence of an effective complaints and investigations pathway. Thankfully many complaints can be quickly and easily resolved. However, if you need to undertake investigations or a review of your HR policies, and want to ensure you are conducting it with best practice, our training is developed by investigators for investigators. Contact WISE today to find out more.

Failing to Involve HR and Other Investigation Mistakes

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Being able to conduct a competent workplace investigation is essential for employers, especially when allegations of bullying, misconduct or inappropriate office behaviour are made. 

Mistakes made during an investigation may result in serious consequences, including legal action. 

Let's take a look at the basics of an investigation, and some key mistakes to avoid.

WHy are workplace investigations necessary?

Workplace investigations are used to establish whether conduct or incidents occurred as alleged by the complainant, and to ensure that appropriate action is taken. 

Investigations are necessary when:

  • An employee may have engaged in behaviour which could result in disciplinary action or termination;
  • Complaints or reports of inappropriate conduct are received;
  • Allegations have been made by one staff member against another - such as claims of workplace bullying, harassment or unreasonable performance management.
  • There is evidence of breaches of safety provisions or other procedures.
  • There are allegations of child abuse. 

what does an investigation involve?

An investigation involves the unbiased gathering and evaluation of relevant and objective evidence, for example by interviewing witnesses and involved parties, reviewing documentary evidence, and or doing a site inspection. 

The conduct, once it established that it occurred, is then measured against the organisation's policies and procedures, Code of Conduct, regulations or legislation, to determine whether a breach has occurred.

what are some key investigation mistakes?

Significant mistakes which can occur during an investigation include:

  • Failing to consider all the relevant evidence - for example, by failing to interview all relevant parties, not asking appropriate questions or failing to document all information collected;
  • Appointing the wrong investigator - for example, by appointing an investigator who is not seen to be independent or who lacks experience in conducting workplace investigations; 
  • Not reporting a complaint to Human Resources and a failure to seek advice;
  • Not allowing the participants procedural fairness by failing to inform them accurately of the complaint against them, failing to give them adequate time to prepare a response or failing to inform them of their right to have a support person present. 
  • Failing to anticipate all the potential risks that could arise during an investigation
  • Failing to provide appropriate notification to all the relevant parties; and
  • Breaching privacy obligations 

so, who should investigate?

The appropriate person to investigate is often determined by the nature of the complaint or allegation - depending on the situation, it may be appropriate to have a senior manager or a member of the Human Resources department review an allegation. 

Avoid actual, perceived or potential conflicts of interest. The investigator must be a neutral party, not someone who is closely connected to the matter, who has had prior involvement in it, who has a direct interest in the outcome or may be a witness in the matter.

When determining who to appoint as an investigator, it is also crucial to assess who has the right level of experience and appropriate skills. 

This was highlighted in a High Court case involving Patrick Stevedores, where an HR manager was appointed to conduct a serious misconduct investigation. However, her lack of experience meant that she failed to gather crucial evidence supporting the dismissal of an employee - who was ultimately found to have been unfairly dismissed.

Should an external or internal investigator be appointed?

In some circumstances, it may not be appropriate to investigate a complaint in-house. Some reasons to appoint an external investigator include; 

  • Internal staff may lack the required skills or knowledge;
  • There is insufficient internal capacity to focus on an investigation; 
  • Allegations have been made against a senior employee, who in other circumstances may be the one tasked with an investigation; 
  • There are concerns an internal investigator may be perceived as being biased and a higher level of neutrality and objectivity is required.
  • The issues raised are complex and/or involve a large number of people in the organisation or significant external oversight. 

If the allegation involves an internal procedure or a matter involving particular expertise (such as a medical incident occurring in a hospital) then it may be more appropriate to engage an internal investigator, or have both external and internal investigators working together. 

Risks of an investigation being conducted incorrectly

There are many situations in which a poor workplace investigation can have serious consequenced for a business. It can lead to adverse legal action - such as in the Patrick Stevedores case. It can also result in serious mental health implications for staff who are unfairly treated during the investigative process, with a subsequent increase in resignations or terminations. It can also result in failure to meet legal or procedural requirements set by external oversight bodies. 

Lesson for employers

When making decisions in relation to workplace investigations, employers should:

  • Ensure that employees are aware of existing internal policies about harassment and discrimination and conduct regular training in these areas;
  • Have a regular system for updating and reviewing policies and procedures, including complaints procedures;
  • Select an appropriate and impartial investigator;
  • Respond promptly and undertake enquiries in relation to each complaint or allegation to determine whether a formal investigation is required;
  • Evaluate all facts with a view to reaching an adequately reasoned conclusion in the circumstances of an allegation;
  • Inform the parties involved of the outcome of the investigation.  

Are you concerned about a lack of knowledge or the risk of making mistakes in your workplace investigations? WISE Workplace is able to offer both full and supported investigation services. In addition, we can train your staff in how to conduct effective workplace investigations.

Managing Relationships in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Anyone who has been following the news recently will be aware that scandalous sexual relationships in the workplace have become something of a common theme. 

The stories of Seven West Chief Executive, Tim Worner and his former executive assistant (a relationship which ended in legal action), the forced resignations of senior AFL executives over their relationships with younger staff, and the notorious pregnancy of former Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce's staffer have all been highly publicised. 

The ironic fallout of Mr Joyce's relationship is the so-called "bonk ban", instituted by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. That ban is intended to prevent all relationships between ministers and their staff, and presumably avoid another scenario such as Mr Joyce's extra-martial affair. 

But is this something which employers can actually impose? Particularly in circumstances where many romantic relationships are forged in the workplace?

can employer prohibit relationships in the workplace?

Although it is virtually unheard of for blanket bans on all relationships to be imposed in any workplace, it is not uncommon for disclosure policies to be introduced. 

The intention of such policies is to require staff members to disclose sexual relationships which could result in a conflict of interest, for example when the relationship is between a supervisor and their subordinate.

Such a code of conduct is designed to manage situations where the interests of the business may be in direct conflict with the romantic or personal interests of the employees. 

Actual conflicts of interest vs perceived conflict of interest

Arguably any relationship in the workplace - not necessarily even a romantic one - could lead to a conflict, particularly when the relationship falls apart or ends badly. This can result in staff feeling unable to work together or believing that they are being victimised by their former lover or friend. 

However, it is important to understand the difference between an actual conflict, and a perceived conflict. 

The Fair Work Commission's decision of Mihalopoulos v Westpac Banking Corporation [2015] FWC 2087 illustrates the difference. In this case, a Westpac bank manager was dismissed from his role due to his conduct arising out of his relationship with one of the bank's employees. 

According to Westpac, Mr Mihalopoulos was dismissed because he was dishonest about his relationship with the worker, breached an apprehended violence order imposed by the worker (after the relationship ended) and inappropriately discussed details of their relationship with his subordinates. 

During the course of the hearing, Mr Mihalopoulos admitted that he had put forward his lover for promotions while they were in a relationship, despite denying their relationship to superiors. 

The Fair Work Commission ultimately determined that employers were entitled to expect that their workers were honest about the nature of relationships that had formed, so that any conflicts of interest arising from these relationships could be managed. 

Further, Mr Mihalopoulos' ongoing and repeated dishonesty about the circumstances of his relationship meant that the business was not in a position to appropriately manage conflicts and therefore manage its own risk. Accordingly, Mr Mihalopoulos' unfair termination application was ultimately dismissed. 

How can relationships be managed in the workplace?

In order to manage the minefield of personal relationships in the workplace, Human Resources departments should ensure that both conflict of interest and disclosure policies are in place, which employees should sign up to as part of their terms of employment. 

Once a disclosure has been made, the conflict of interest policy should provide steps to be taken to minimise ongoing risks to the business. For example, staff might be reassigned to different supervisors to ensure that appropriate disciplinary action can still be taken. 

It is critical not only that these policies exist but that they are clearly communicated to all staff, and that staff are made aware of the potential consequences of failing to adhere to these policies, including redeployment or dismissal. 

If you need assistance in managing workplace relationships at your organisation, contact us. Our team can help formulate policies around disclosure and conflict of interest, and can investigate allegations of misconduct. 

How to Implement and Promote Workplace Policies

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, April 04, 2018

A suite of robust policies and procedures is an essential element of good governance in any organisation. Often employers discover that their policies and procedures are inadequate, only once their actions are reviewed by a tribunal or court. 

Adequate workplace policies are key mechanisms for outlining exactly what the standards of conduct are in your organisation. Workplace policies should clearly and succinctly explain the topic covered and provide the procedures that need to be followed in a given area. 

Let's take a look at the features of a well-written policy, plus the best ways to implement, promote and review these important business documents.

the benefit of a well-written policy

The benefits of a well-written policy cannot be overstated. Sometimes policies are mistakenly seen as 'stating the obvious' in the workplace. Yet, without workplace policies that set out clear requirements and processes, confusion and mismanagement can spread across the organisation. 

A good place to start when developing a policy or procedure is to seek the ideas and input from the key people involved. This can improve staff commitment to the policy if they observe in the final document that their voice has been heard. 

In terms of style, a well-written policy must demonstrate clarity and specificity. While it is in order to outline at the beginning of a policy where it 'fits' into organisational objectives, generalisations should be avoided. 

For example, rather than requesting that 'staff should make sure that they respect client privacy when it comes to using files', a well written policy is likely to include specific directives such as 'Hardcopy client files must be stored in the section F compactus within 30 minutes of use'.

developing policies to suit your workplace

There is an art to developing and introducing workplace policies that will be read, understood, accepted and actually used. 

Firstly, all stakeholders in the organisation - staff, suppliers, clients, contractors - need to see that management is fully in support of the policy's content. Policies without perceived support and commitment from management are unlikely to gain traction with staff. 

Similarly, policy developers must consult effectively with staff about the proposed policies and welcome their comments; after all, they are the ones likely to be dealing with the contents on a day-to-day basis. 

A well-written workplace policy needs to clearly define key terms within the policy. New employees will need to familiarise themselves with expectations of their role and responsibilities as quickly as possible, without the confusing jargon. Defining 'the obvious' terms can save frustration and costs down the track. 

introducing policies and procedures

Once the scope and substance are ascertained, the policy must be documented and distributed effectively. 

Make sure that the initial publicity effort is multi-media and ensure that during induction of new employees, in team meetings, on the intranet, at training, in the staff bulletin and on the kitchen cork board (plus anywhere else that works), you give clear information about the policy and where to find it. 

Following up on your publicity about the policy and refresher training is essential and should be carried out regularly across the organisation.

Evaluation and review

No matter how well written, a good policy or procedure will still need to be evaluated and reviewed. 

A logical starting point can be to check effectiveness against key objectives. For example, injury rates or client complaint numbers might be used to gauge the success or otherwise of a particular policy. 

Another good source of information to help you assess the policy will be the people actually impacted by its wording. 

Policy developers need to be truly open to ideas when it comes to reviewing existing policies. Good governance and strong organisational achievement will often depend upon robust, realistic and clearly-worded policy documents. 

WISE Workplace can review your current policies, advise you on their appropriateness and update your suite of policies and procedures. Contact us today!

Inside the Fair Work Commission: How it Operates

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Most employers and employees are likely have at least some contact with the Fair Work Commission (FWC) during their working lives. 

This might be as simple as obtaining information about award conditions and employee rights, or as contentious as appearing before the FWC in a workplace dispute or unfair dismissal matter.

So how does the Fair Work Commission work?

The basics of the fwc

The FWC is the national workplace relations tribunal. Created by the Federal Government, it is an independent body that oversees a range of employment-related matters.

Its members are independent office holders who are appointed by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Federal Government. Members work in a panel system, which aims to ensure that matters are heard by members with specific expertise in the relevant area. 

The FWC is not to be confused with the Fair Work Ombudsman, whose role it is to enforce compliance with the Fair Work Act and associated legislation, as well as provide advice to employers and employees on industrial relations matters. Unlike the FWC, the Ombudsman cannot conduct investigations or hearings.

what matters does the fwc deal with?

The FWC has the right to make decisions on a wide range of employment issues, including:

  • Determining minimum wage and working conditions
  • Hearing disputes in relation to unfair dismissals or other disciplinary actions
  • Making decisions in relation to appropriate industrial action
  • Conducting and facilitating alternative resolution methods in relation to general workplace disputes and workplace protections  

When making decisions, the FWC is required to take into account factors such as:

  • The principles of equity and good conscience
  • An assessment of the merits of the case before it
  • Avoiding any type of discrimination in the workplace, whether that be sexual, religious, disability or age based, to name a few

how to get a matter heard before the fwc

In order for a matter to be heard by the FWC, an appropriate form needs to be submitted in accordance with the applicable Fair Work Commission Rules.

In certain circumstances, such as when conducting reviews into awards or wage reviews, the FWC is empowered to launch its own action. 

fairness a key focus of hearings

The FWC is obliged by legislation to facilitate reasonably swift actions, and operate informally - without resorting to complicated legal concepts which could make it difficult for the ordinary worker to participate in proceedings. 

One of the central tenets of the FWC requires that hearings be conducted impartially and fairly. During hearings, the members are required to determine the facts and make decisions based on the information put before them. Ultimately, the main purpose of a hearing is to facilitate dispute resolution between the parties. 

Can the FWC dismiss an application? 

An application may be dismissed outright by the FWC in circumstances where it is:

  • Frivolous or vexatious
  • Contrary to the applicable legislation
  • Doomed to fail
  • Clear that one of the parties has unreasonably failed to attend hearings or comply with orders or directions of the FWC. 

What the FWC can't do

Despite being a quasi-legal body, the FWC is not entitled to provide legal advice, or assistance.

It is also not permitted to act in a partisan fashion by representing any particular political party. It must focus on impartial and objective decision making.

Do you need assistance in dealing with the FWC?

WISE Workplace is highly experienced at conducting investigations into allegations of workplace misconduct across government, education, not-for-profit and private sectors. 

We are proud that none of our decisions have been challenged by the FWC. If you are looking for assistance to navigate the challenging issues of workplace misconduct, we provide investigation services and training - Contact WISE today.  

How Surveys Can Uncover Secrets of Your Workplace Culture

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Employers are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of a positive workplace culture. A workplace culture which helps foster happy employees can increase productivity, reduce absenteeism and have a positive flow-on effect to customers. 

But just how can senior management get staff, particularly junior staff, to open up about how they feel? One excellent and very popular method is by engaging in workplace culture surveys.

what is it?

A cultural survey is an important diagnostic tool to uncover the current health of an organisation, and is a way for management to determine strengths, weaknesses and important strategic areas of focus for the business. 

Using surveys, employers can establish whether they are on the "same page" strategically as their employees, if there are any concerns regarding bullying or unsafe workplace practices, issues affecting health and wellbeing, and what the business is doing particularly well.

Cultural surveys are frequently administered externally, and participants are guaranteed anonymity. This is an essential part of the process, as it permits staff to feel as though their responses, whether positive or negative, can be provided without fear of reprisal or criticism. 

They require a number of specific questions to be answered. The responses are then tallied and data is extracted and analysed in the form of a report which is generally presented to management or the board.

when to do a cultural survey?

The best time to introduce an initial cultural survey is when the senior leadership team has already begun implementing a process of cultural change, whether that involves becoming an employer of choice to potential new talent or retaining existing talent. 

Once a cultural survey has already been completed in the business, it is a good idea to repeat them regularly, perhaps every two or three years, for management to be able to assess how the business is performing against previous years and whether a change in direction may be required. 

what questions should not be included?

Part of focusing on improving a workplace culture also involves changing the way in which the business recognises and rewards exceptional performance. This mental shift should occur before the cultural survey is introduced - otherwise the business risks getting answers to the wrong sort of questions. 

Those questions include ones that do not consider what truly makes employees happy, but instead focus on factors such as remuneration, perks (such as professional coffee machines) or flashy offices. While these can be an important component of making an employee feel valued or happy in their role, they are rarely a determining factor in whether an employee truly feels committed to a business.

so what are the right questions?

Instead, employers should ensure that cultural surveys focus on questions such as:

  • Do you understand the company's goals, and your role in achieving those goals?
  • Do you feel as though your role is important in achieving the company's objectives?
  • Do you understand the company strategy and agree with it? 
  • Do you feel that your team is collaborative?
  • Do you feel that you have the skills necessary to perform your role, and if not, why not?
  • Is there anything in the workplace preventing you from performing your role?

Employers may also wish to ask staff what improvements they would make, given the chance. This can be a very useful tool in implementing a new strategic direction.

the benefits of a cultural survey

Perhaps the greatest benefit of a cultural survey is that when employees feel like they are connected to the "bigger picture", they are more invested in the business and feel part of a team. 

This in turn helps improve their reliability, performance, desire to participate and willingness to sacrifice (if necessary) for the good of the business. The sense of collaboration created by a cultural survey is an invaluable asset to the business. 

A cultural survey may also bring up issues which have not previously been identified by management, such as endemic bullying or a toxic workplace.

how to get started

These few simple steps can help employers get started on conducting a survey.

  • Be clear about the purpose of the survey
  • Ensure you offer all team members the opportunity to participate
  • Decide whether a face to face, paper or electronic survey is appropriate or even a combination of all three if you have high staff numbers
  • Decide on the timeframe for responses
  • Formulate the questions and keep it simple - for example avoid asking two things in the same question
  • Analyse the results - don't take the results on face value, for example a low response rate to a particular question may make the results meaningless
  • Follow up on the survey insights and take appropriate action

WISE Workplace is here to support your organisation. If you have a concern about a toxic culture, or staff are making complaints, we are well placed to help you conduct a cultural survey.

Conducting Workplace Investigations: What You Need to Know

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Part of running an effective organisation is ensuring that all staff are held accountable for their actions in the workplace, and are able to air grievances and raise complaints in a safe forum. This means that employers may need to undertake investigations into staff misconduct from time to time. 

Managing an unbiased and thorough workplace investigation can be a challenging and complicated process, particularly given the need to deal with sensitive topics and personal feelings. 

So, what are the most important things you need to be aware of when conducting a workplace investigation?

understanding why an investigation is necessary

All employers have a duty to provide a healthy and safe place of work. This includes obligations around workplace bullying, which can be enforced by the Fair Work Commission. 

Workers Compensation claims can arise from employees experiencing stress or other physical or mental harm because of issues with co-workers. If the alleged behaviour is serious enough (such as sexual harassment or assault for example) the employer could become civilly or even criminally liable. 

Employers must conduct fair investigations into all types of allegations made by complainants. Similarly, the accused worker has the right to have the complaint against them determined objectively and the sanction decided on by an unbiased decision-maker.

how can your human resources team support you?

If your organisation is large enough to have a dedicated Human Resources officer or even an HR team, it can be extremely helpful to have them involved in an investigation. 

Your HR team can facilitate a successful investigation by:

  • Keeping open channels of communication with both the complainant and the respondent (as long as confidential information is kept private);
  • Providing a clear timeline and outline of processes;
  • Ensuring that staff are aware of their rights to have support persons involved;
  • At all times maintaining respectful contact and a clear demonstration of objectivity when dealing with witnesses or parties involved.  

fact finding vs formal investigation

Any workplace complaint requires a process of fact-finding or initial enquiry, whereby a third party interviews both the complainant and the accused party for information about what happened. The objective of this process is to determine whether the matter is serious enough to warrant a formal investigation or whether the conduct complained of can for instance be deemed trivial or minor in nature and can be dealt with on that basis. 

A formal investigation process goes much further. It requires the collection of information and evidence, interviewing of witnesses and the drafting of formal statements, the preparation of a detailed investigation report, analysis of the evidence and subsequent detailed consideration by key decision-makers as to the appropriate consequences.

The need for procedural fairness 

A key element of any workplace investigation is to ensure that all parties are afforded procedural fairness - a failure to do this could result in criticism of any decision taken by the employer after the investigation and could expose the organisation to legal liability.

The key elements of procedural fairness include:

  • Providing adequate information about the allegations, generally in written form, and the potential consequences if the employee is found to have engaged in the alleged behaviour;
  • Permitting a reasonable amount of time for the employee to respond to the allegations;
  • Allowing a support person to be present during interviews and providing adequate notice to the interviewee to arrange a support person of their choice;
  • Ensuring that the investigator as well as the ultimate decision-maker is unbiased and objective;
  • Ensuring that decisions effecting the employee are based on evidence. 

So what is involved in conducting a workplace investigation?

The key elements of an effective investigation include:

1. Planning the Investigation

  • Adequate planning before the investigation starts, including considering any potential conflicts of interest;
  • The investigator familiarising himself/herself with the potential consequences which could flow from the investigation, and ensuring that all relevant parties will be interviewed;
  • Preparing a list of interview questions for each witness;
  • Gather and review relevant documents such as the complaint, employment contracts, performance reviews, relevant policies and procedures, incident reports, and any other relevant emails, notices, memos, other documents and information;
  • Notify all parties of there involvement, rights and obligations. 

2. Interviewing

  • Provide sufficient notice and make appropriate arrangements with all witnesses
  • Conducting formal interviews objectively and sensitively, having regard to the circumstances;
  • Checking that representation or support has been offered and outlining the investigation process and timeline;
  • Obtaining as much detailed evidence as possible

3. Analysing and Weighing the Evidence

  • Assessing the evidence with regard to reliability, consistency and credibility;
  • Preparing an investigation report setting out your findings, including the behaviour that has or has not occurred and consider whether it is unlawful, unreasonable, or a breach of policy;
  • Coming to a conclusion and making a finding, based on the evidence gathered. 

4. Facilitating a Resolution

  • This could include making amendments to business policies, training improvements, broad disciplinary action, mediation and counselling. 

When to ask for help

The consequences of a flawed investigation can be serious: decisions can be challenged in the courts, reputations can suffer and employee morale can take a nose-dive. 

In some situations, it may not be appropriate to conduct an investigation internally, and an external investigator is required to help ensure a fair and unbiased process. 

This could include situations where: 

  • Serious allegations are made and there is a potential risk of criminal or civil litigation;
  • Complaints are made against senior employees;
  • A real or perceived conflict of interest exists, meaning complaints cannot be investigated objectively internally; 
  • There is a need for legal privilege to cover the circumstances;
  • There are insufficient internal resources, where your organisation is simply not able to investigate a complaint thoroughly, due to a lack of expertise, particularly if it involves multiple parties or complex issues that require specialist knowledge. 

If you require assistance with investigating allegations of misconduct, contact WISE Workplace. We offer full investigation services, supported investigations and staff training on how to conduct workplace investigations. 

The Cost of Aggressive Leaders

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 24, 2018

There are many different skills which are required for an effective leader - such as excellent communication skills, perseverance, the ability to inspire and motivate staff, clarity of thought, and efficiency. But one detrimental trait that many leaders may possess is aggression.

Although it is often accepted that a domineering personality seems to go hand in hand with successful leadership, in many situations it can actually get in the way of optimal and effective management.

a bad habit or a behavioural strength? 

There are different levels on the scale of aggression - and indeed, for some jobs a level of combativeness is almost an essential quality. From a CEO accustomed to facilitating hostile takeovers, to a litigator who must take charge of a courtroom, to a police officer, in these careers, behavioural traits which are more closely aligned with aggression can be helpful. 

Contrast this with "softer" jobs, such as a primary school teacher, a nurse, a psychologist or a social worker, and it becomes apparent that certain personality traits are much better suited to some industries than others. 

Hiring managers and HR managers responsible for recruitment and selection of managers need to be aware of the difference between simple assertiveness and unbridled aggression or even narcissism.

the difference between assertive and aggressive

A "positive" and assertive boss might:

  • Engage in competition against external competitors, but support a whole team ethos;
  • Be forthright and open, including potentially critical - but be equally willing to accept criticism of their own methods;
  • Seek facts;
  • Respect the rights of staff to their own opinions. 

In comparison, a "negative" aggressive or narcissistic boss may:

  • Constantly compete with their own staff;
  • Belittle or punish those who disagree with the leader;
  • Base decisions on their emotions or feelings rather than rational or logical conclusions;
  • Mock or otherwise put down staff; 
  • Yell, gesture, stride around or otherwise engage in physically intimidating behaviours.

the downsides of aggressive behaviour in the workforce

In its most basic form, employees who work for aggressive leaders can be uninspired and unhappy, often not wishing to come to work. A leader who storms around like a bear with a sore head, as the expression goes, is likely to cause, or at the very least contribute to, a toxic workplace. 

This, in turn, can lead to significant losses in productivity, high rates of absenteeism or presenteeism (where staff physically turn up but do not properly fulfil their duties) and excessive staff turnover. 

changing leadership behaviour 

It can be difficult to modify leadership behaviour, particularly when it comes to leaders with type-A personalities, which will likely mean that they are reluctant to accept criticism or receive feedback well. 

Strategies for changing leadership behaviour, or at least improving the ability of staff to deal with aggressive leaders, include:

  • Building a strong relationship between the leader and the rest of their team, including by encouraging open communication and fostering the ability for human resources staff as well as team members to provide feedback on decisions made by the leader. 
  • Appeal to the leader's sense of logic and highlight the potential impact of their actions on the business.
  • In the case of narcissistic leaders, it can be helpful to frame feedback on their behaviour in terms of how it might negatively affect their goals, rather than as a direct personal criticism.
  • Stop supporting this type of behaviour by refusing to promote or reward leaders who are aggressive, and who refuse help to modify their behaviour. 

Taking a few simple steps towards correcting the ongoing behaviour of an aggressive leader, while still highlighting the importance of strength in decision-making, can help to significantly improve the satisfaction, productivity and quality of your workers. If you believe you have an aggressive leader or a toxic workplace where an investigation or cultural review would help, contact WISE today for an obligation free quote. 

Tackling a Toxic Workplace Culture

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Many people start off each year with a bundle of resolutions - to eat better, to exercise more, to spend more time with the kids... the list goes on. The start of a new calendar year is also a fantastic time for businesses to take stock and reassess. If your workplace culture is getting in the way of your business fulfilling it's potential, make change your top New Year's resolution for 2018.

what is workplace culture? 

Culture is loosely defined as the beliefs and behaviours that govern how people act in an organisation. 

While it is often considered to be a vague concept, how workers interact with each other is an incredibly important part of work life. Good organisational culture is now believed to be a key factor in a business' success or failure. 

If staff feel uncomfortable, unhappy or excluded, they will obviously not enjoy coming to work - which generally means that they will be less motivated, less productive and reluctant to go beyond the call of duty when asked.

how to identify if your workplace culture is bad

Whether a workplace is toxic or not is difficult to define. Generally speaking, if people are unhappy at work more often than not, you are dealing with a poor workplace culture. 

Factors that can contribute to a toxic culture include:

  • Staff not being trusted to take calculated risks or perform their jobs without being micromanaged.
  • Workers constantly being asked to perform under significant pressure and without adequate resources being allocated to assist them.
  • A lack of clarity or top-down direction.
  • Poor leadership behaviour or interaction 

what happens when workplace cultures are toxic

Toxic cultures can breed hostile, pessimistic team members, drive away top talent and prevent organisations from reaching their full potential. 

Some signs and consequences of toxicity include:

  • Increasing staff conflict
  • High staff turnover
  • High levels of absenteeism
  • Presenteeism (where people physically show up at work, but don't perform their duties to the best of their abilities)
  • Increased workers' compensation claims
  • Complaints of bullying or other types of harassment 

HOW to chage a negative workplace culture

In order to address workplace toxicity, employers need to be prepared to tackle issues head-on. 

These 10 steps towards changing workplace culture for the better can help make the task less daunting.

  1. Identify and assess the underlying problems. This is best achieved by issuing a staff survey, conducting exit interviews to determine why staff are leaving, or otherwise encouraging open and honest feedback. 
  2. Establish a concrete company vision. Ensure that all employees are engaged with the vision and understand where the business is headed.
  3. Rinse and repeat - ideally, make sure that surveys and opinion polls are conducted on a regular basis to identify what factors may be improving or worsening the workplace culture.
  4. Encourage consultation and open communication. In addition to helping filter ideas and feedback up to the leadership team, this makes staff feel valued and assists in reducing emotions such as frustration or anger.
  5. Facilitate friendships and encourage team building. If your staff actually like each other, they are much more likely to take additional steps to support co-workers and the business. 
  6. Be consistent and fair. One of the biggest gripes of staff who feel they operate in a toxic environment is that their supervisors seem to change attitudes on a regular basis, or that responses are likely to vary depending on what mood the boss is in. 
  7. Maintain a sense of fun - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, as the saying goes, and creating a workplace where staff feel at home is much more likely to improve morale. 
  8. Pick your team wisely. When selecting and hiring new staff, consider how they will fit into the team and how they will get on with your other workers.
  9. Be physically present. Although senior staff will doubtless have different hours and regimes to stick to than average workers, it is disheartening to see supervisors roll in regularly at 11am with coffee in hand, head out for long lunches and then leave in the early afternoon. Allow your staff to see that you are working just as hard as they are. 
  10. Recognise the efforts of staff. Whether this is through an employee of the month program, an annual awards dinner or simply ongoing quiet acknowledgement of good performance, ensure that staff know they are appreciated. 

So, start this year the right way - make your workplace somewhere your staff want to be, instead of somewhere they have to be. And if you're having difficultly with a toxic workplace culture, WISE can help, through out investigation, mediation and governance services. 

How to Truly Relax Over the Summer Holidays

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Christmas tree is up, the fairy lights are lit, the bonbons are set on the table, the trifle is in the fridge - and you are sifting through your phone, replying to just one more email, tweaking just one more slide on the Powerpoint, making just one more phone call to a prospective client. Happy holidays, right? 

If this resembled your Christmas, you're not alone. Nearly 73% of Australians continue to work in some way while they are on leave. This figure is sure to continue rising, as thanks to email, text and social media, people are now contactable 24/7, no matter where they are in the world. 

So, a very modern question - is it possible to have a true break from work, relax fully, and not worry about what might be awaiting you when you return?

it's all about PREPARATION

The key is to organise things before you go away, so that you're in the right headspace to relax and revitalise. 

Top tips to prepare for your holiday break include:  

  • Plan ahead - prepare a list of issues that might come up while you are away and assign them to people who will be working. If necessary, arrange for the relevant people to have access to your emails or your mailbox so that important correspondence can be dealt with in your absence. 
  • Ensure that people you work with, and people you deal with externally, are aware that you are going on leave, and when you will be back. It also helps to give several weeks' notice that you will be away, so that you are not inundated with requests on your way out the door. 
  • Keep a few clear days before you head off on holidays to deal with last-minute issues and put out fires as necessary.
  • Organise yourself so that you have the items requiring your top attention ready to deal with as soon as you return. 

Once you walk out of the workplace, switch off!

Turn off the phone, turn off the emails, and don't check in - relax and enjoy your time off. In almost every case, things will keep going without you. 

Stuck at work?

Of course, not all of us get time off over the summer period. 

If you do have to work through, try to: 

  • Plan your days to maximise what you can achieve, while still allowing time to re-focus. Make sure you take a lunch break, or find some time to stretch your legs.
  • Keep a positive attitude towards having to be at work - someone will benefit from you being there to help!
  • Motivate yourself by planning a break or some time off as a reward after the busy summer holiday season, even if it is just time spent with family at home. 

managing your stress levels is also key to relaxing

While we're all very familiar with the term, what exactly is meant by "stress"? Stress sparks the fight or flight response, preparing the body for action against a potential threat. Adrenaline and cortisol are released, resulting in a speeding up of the heart rate, metabolism and breathing rate. 

Once, this fight or flight response might have kicked in with a mammoth chasing you across the tundra, but in the modern workplace, it's much more likely to result from your supervisor imposing a tight deadline, or dealing with an angry client or a hundred "urgent" emails! 

Stress is largely inevitable, whether you're dealing with issues at work or navigating long holiday queues at the airport. In many ways, it is an acceptable part of modern living - so long as it is managed correctly. 

The stress response can be helpful in the short-term, but long-term, it can have negative effects on your health. Stress can lead to a variety of conditions including fatigue, high blood pressure and depression. 

how mindfulness can help you deal with stress 

A recent buzzword in human resources and psychology, mindfulness is a useful technique for reducing stress. Mindfulness can help you manage your workload better, improve your concentration, increase relaxation and promote self-awareness. 

It involves reflection, prioritisation and listening, without distractions. It means being present in the moment, thinking only of the task at hand, and re-focusing on your work and its purpose. 

There are a number of mindfulness techniques you can try, including mediation, paying attention to your breathing and progressively relaxing your muscles. 

So whether you are working through or taking time off these holidays, make 2018 the year you return to the workplace relaxed and re-focused, and better able to manage stress! 

And if you'd like to get your 2018 off on the right start, we have training programs available to ensure your workplace investigation is as stress free as possible.