Legal Issues When Conducting Workplace Interviews

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, August 29, 2018

When a workplace investigation has to be conducted, the most valuable information will generally be obtained through interviewing the staff involved in the incident and any witnesses. This information will play a critical role in determining what has happened or who or what was responsible. 

In order to obtain relevant and reliable information from the parties involved, good communication skills, an eye for detail and the ability to think on your feet is required. However, it is equally important to remember your legal obligations when interviewing staff.

legal issues

In conducting an interview process, key legal issues include:

  • The creation of statements 
    When an interview is conducted, a statement recording the comments made during the interview must be prepared and provided to the interviewee for review and, if the contents of the statement are agreed upon, signature. 
  • Audio recordings
    The laws on the creation of audio recordings differ in each Australian state. Generally speaking, if a person is advised that they are being recorded and they do not explicitly object, it is acceptable to continue with an audio recording. It is best practice to seek their explicit approval once recording has commenced. It is important to bear in mind that a transcript of the recording must be made available to the interviewee upon request. 
  • Support person
    Anybody involved in a workplace investigation, but especially the person against whom allegations have been made, must have the opportunity to have a support person of their choice present during each step of the investigative process, particularly during the interview. Witnesses have to be informed of this right in advance, in order to provide them with the opportunity to find a suitable support person.   

Procedural fairness and privacy

Perhaps the most important aspect of any workplace interview is ensuring that the process is conducted in accordance with the rules of procedural fairness. This includes:

  • The complainant and the respondent have the opportunity to provide their entire version of events and to have a support person present. 
  • The respondent is advised of the particulars of the allegations against them, so that they can respond in detail. 
  • The respondent is advised of their rights in relation to the investigative process.
  • Proceedings are not delayed unnecessarily.
  • The respondent has sufficient time to prepare for the interview process. Best practice is to allow at least 48 hours' notice but preferably more, depending on the complexity of the particulars. 
  • All relevant witnesses are interviewed.
  • Exculpatory and inculpatory evidence is taken into account.
  • All evidence is considered in an unbiased and impartial manner. 
  • No finding of guilt or otherwise is made until after all parties have had the opportunity to participate in the interview process and had the opportunity to respond to the allegations against them. 

All parties involved in the investigation are entitled to privacy. Witnesses who have disclosed information in confidence, may be intimidated by the fear of victimisation or backlash. This means that information divulged during the interview process is to be kept strictly confidential, unless it is absolutely necessary for the resolution of the dispute that it be shared beyond the immediate investigative team.

tips for successfully conducting an interview

In addition to taking the above steps, inexperienced interviewers may wish to consider obtaining specific legal advice, depending on the situation and the allegations which have been made. 

The interview process should always be undertaken from the perspective that only information which is collected fairly and decisions which are made in an unbiased manner will support disciplinary or administrative action against any employee. 

If you dismiss an employee or take disciplinary action against them without affording procedural fairness and establishing the relevant facts, it is possible that Fair Work Australia or other relevant tribunals may find the action was harsh, unjust or unreasonable in the circumstances. 

An investigation may be costly and time consuming, however the consequences of not conducting one may be even greater. If you need assistance in conducting investigations and undertaking investigative interviewing, contact WISE Workplace today, or purchase our 'Investigative Interviewing Book'.   

Stand By Me: The Role of the Support Person

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, February 28, 2018

For an employee who is on the receiving end of disciplinary action, performance management or a workplace investigation, it is an upsetting, and even a potentially traumatic experience. 

Every employee involved in such a process is entitled to have a support person present during any meetings or interviews. 

A failure to afford an employee a support person can result in the process being deemed a breach of procedural fairness, and the outcome may be declared invalid upon review.

what is the role of a support person?

The role of the support person in any interview or meeting is to provide moral and emotional support, ensure that the process is fair, and to assist with communication - they are not required, or permitted, to act as an advocate, put forward a version of events or make an argument on behalf of the employee.

While support persons are entitled to ask some questions about the process, it is crucial that they don't respond or answer questions in terms of the substance of the matter, on behalf of the employee. 

A person engaged as a translator cannot generally act as a support person at the same time.

CAN AN EMPLOYER DENY A REQUEST FOR A SPECIFIC SUPPORT PERSON?

Only in certain exceptional circumstances the employer can refuse to have a specific person sit in as a support person. 

These circumstances include where the requested support person:

  • Holds a more senior role in the organisation than the person who is conducting the interview - thereby creating a risk of undue influence or pressure by the support person on the interviewer;
  • Could be disruptive to the process or has their own agenda (such as a former employee or somebody who is known to be on bad terms with management or the executive);
  • Is involved with the subject matter of the investigation or may be witness to some of the events. A person who is involved in the investigation in some way cannot be seen to be neutral and it is not desirable for a potential witness to have access to the respondent's evidence. 

Although employers may be able to object to a specific support person who has been requested, they are required to advise employees of their right to select a different person.

tHE ATTITUDE OF THE FAIR WORK COMMISSION

When determining cases of unfair dismissal, one of the factors the Fair Work Commission considers is whether the employee was unreasonably denied the right to have a support person present during any interviews. 

Best practice for employers

To ensure best practice in disciplinary or investigative processes, the following steps should be undertaken:

  • Employees must be advised of their right to select a support person for any relevant meeting
  • Employees must have the opportunity for the meeting to be organised, within reason, at a time when the support person is available
  • The support person must receive a clear explanation of their role - that is, to provide moral support only. 
  • The employer must take into account any additional considerations that could apply, such as those involved in an Enterprise Agreement or similar negotiated agreement with the employee. 

Offering employees a support person to attend any meetings and interviews related to disciplinary action, performance management, or workplace investigation with them, is crucial to the fair outcome of these processes. 

For more detailed information on conducting interviews, you can purchase a copy of our book Investigative Interviewing: A Guide for Workplace Investigators. If you're conducting a workplace investigation and need assistance, contact WISE Workplace today.  

Investigating Allegations of Abuse in Care in Aged Care Facilities

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Aged care providers have been in the media spotlight in recent weeks. While some are alleged to have financially exploited the elderly others are alleged to have provided a substandard level of care. Research conducted by Curtin University in 2015 suggests that some 167,000 older Australians may be subject to abuse annually.

Like many other types of domestic or sexual violence, it is also likely that elder abuse is significantly under-reported, so the true scope of abuse may be far greater.

what is elder abuse?

According to the World Health Organisation, elder abuse is 'a single or repeated act or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust which causes harm or distress to an older person.' The perpetrators of elder abuse can include children, spouses, friends and neighbours, or staff at care facilities where the victims reside. 

There are many different forms of elder abuse, including:   

  • Physical Abuse - Inflicting physical pain, injury or impairment. Can include forcibly restraining or inappropriately requiring the consumption of drugs. 
  • Emotional or Psychological Abuse - especially through intimidation, humiliation, mockery, isolating, ignoring, or menacing the elderly person. In a care facility, this could include repeatedly and intentionally ignoring calls for assistance. 
  • Sexual Abuse - apart from the obvious, this can include forcing the elderly to watch pornographic material, or even forcing them to take their clothes off without legitimate reasons. 
  • Neglect or Abandonment - failing to provide a requisite standard of care. 
  • Financial Abuse - includes outright theft, coercing elderly people into handing over funds or altering wills. Of particular concern are situations where carers are granted enduring powers of attorney, which enable the holder to undertake all legal actions that the person otherwise would be entitled to. Enduring guardianships relate to the right to make medical or health-related decisions on behalf of another person. 
  • Healthcare Fraud - such as billing for services which have not been provided, or intentionally over/under-medicating for a self-interested reason such as 'kickbacks' from pharmaceutical providers.

what are the signs?

Potential signs of the various types of elder abuse include:

  • A bad or unusual relationship between a care provider and recipient. 
  • Unexplained injuries
  • Insistence by the caregiver that the victim is never attended to without them being present.
  • Behaviour mimicking dementia (even when the victim does not suffer from this condition), which may suggest an emotional regression due to ongoing abuse. 
  • Ongoing poor hygiene and living conditions.
  • Significant financial withdrawals being made from the victim's accounts, or noticeable and inexplicable generosity by the suspected victim towards a specific caregiver. 

Of course, this is not an exhaustive list. Care providers and employers should ensure that any behavioural or physical changes in their clients are observed and monitored, particularly sudden ones, which occur without explanation. 

In terms of the Aged Care Act 1997, Section 63-1AA the definition of a mandatory reportable incident for persons in residential care include unlawful sexual contact and unreasonable use of force on a resident. 

Providers are required to report to the Department of Health and the Police within 24 hours if they have any suspicion or allegation of reportable assault. 

For person receiving home or flexible care, reportable incidents to the Department of Health include financial abuse. This does not extend to residents in aged care facilities, however, residents' financial abuse still needs to be reported to the Police. 

common risk factors for elder abuse

In the context of care facilities, the greatest risk factors for elder abuse include: 

  • Poor staff training or lack of awareness about what type of treatment is expected to be provided. 
  • Unhappy working conditions, contributing to staff feeling that they need to 'lash out' at clients.
  • Excessive responsibilities and inadequate levels of support. 
  • Inappropriately vetted staff, including those with substance abuse issues. 
  • Inadequate policies and procedures related to the protection of vulnerable people and a lack of staff awareness of these policies. 
  • Inadequate complaint handling mechanisms. 

Residents who may be particularly likely to become victims of elder abuse include those who are physically or mentally frail, or those who may be perceived as being very unpleasant to work with - causing care workers to demonstrate inappropriate frustration or aggression.   

How to prevent the risk of ELDER ABUSE

Apart from remaining vigilant about the potential risk factors and apparent signs of elder abuse, care facilities must ensure that:

  • All resident and staff concerns are appropriately listened to and noted. 
  • All staff have have undergone criminal checks.
  • Intervention occurs immediately when elder abuse is suspected and workplace investigations are thorough and swift. 
  • All staff are appropriately trained in the relevant policies and procedures and how to recognise and prevent elder abuse.  

COMPLICATIONS ARISING FROM THE AGEING MEMORY

Mild memory loss and a slowing down of thinking is a natural part of ageing. But while many elderly people are still capable of managing their own affairs, others who have serious conditions such as dementia may lose the capacity to do so.

In some cases, the simple fact that a person has an ageing memory may mean that they are treated as though they do not have any capacity to make decisions for themselves, and are thus at greater risk of elder abuse. 

In the context of patients with dementia or other serious memory loss issues, any complaints they raise may be discounted out of hand as being fabricated. However, when coupled with other signs of potential elder abuse, they should be investigated. 

Complications can also arise around eyewitness memory and conducting interviews in workplace investigations. In such cases, cognitive interviewing techniques can be helpful. 

This may include allowing a witness to draw a sketch or use visualisation techniques, asking them to explain everything that occurred, taking them over events in reverse order, and asking them about how they were feeling at the time of the event can all assist in memory recall. 

Conducting investigations into elder abuse in care contexts can be challenging. The WISE Workplace team is experienced in conducting independent, competent and unbiased investigations into reportable conduct and abuse complaints in care settings. Contact us to discuss your needs, and how we can help.