How to Prevent Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Unfortunately, dealing with allegations of sexual harassment in the workplace is an issue for many employers. Sexual harassment can take many forms, and cases are rarely "open and shut".

Once allegations of sexual harassment or misconduct have been made, they must be appropriately investigated and dealt with. However, prevention is always better than cure.

Let's take a look at employer obligations, the scale of the problem and how employers can help prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

obligation to provide a safe workplace 

Employers are required by law to provide a safe workplace for all employees. This is enshrined in the workplace health and safety legislation throughout Australia (for example, s19 of the Workplace Health and Safety Act 2011 (NSW)).

Legislation requires employers to provide for physical safety, for example, by preventing unsafe worksite practices which could cause injuries to employees. It also extends to ensuring that employees are protected against physical and psychological harm caused by sexual harassment or assault, and mental harm (such as could be caused by bullying or harassment).

The facts - workplace sexual harassment

A 2018 sexual harassment study conducted by the Australian Human Rights Commission, found that one in three Australian workers claim to have been sexually harassed in the workplace in the past five years. This figure has increased from one in five workers in 2012, and one in ten in 2003. Of course, this may be due to employees becoming more aware of what sexual harassment is and what their rights are in relation to reporting or taking steps to report and prevent it. However, it is still a worrying statistic.

Interestingly, although sexual harassment affects both genders (with 26% of men and 39% of women interviewed reporting experiences of sexual harassment), those most likely to be harassed in the workplace are aged between 18 and 29. Moreover, despite the fairly equal gender split in victimology, the overwhelming majority (80%) of harassers are men.

Tips for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace 

There are a number of strategies that can help employers nip sexual harassment in the bud. These include:

  • Management support. It is essential that all levels of management, but particularly the highest levels of the executive team, embrace an anti-harassment culture. This is particularly important when one considers that, at least anecdotally, there may be a perception that sexual victimisation is a top-down phenomenon. It is important for management to demonstrate that no type of sexual harassment will be tolerated in the workplace. Similarly, the executives of any workplace must demonstrate that they will deal swiftly and appropriately with those who have been found to have engaged in sexual harassment. Ultimately, it is essential that the entire business receives the message that sexual victimisation will not be tolerated on any level. This also means that appropriate conduct by managers should always be encouraged.
  • Creation of a sexual harassment policy. A clear, detailed and easily accessible sexual harassment policy should be created, setting out exactly what the company's position on such harassment is. This should include the specific behaviours that will constitute sexual harassment and will not be tolerated. It must also be widely circulated amongst staff, ideally with a sign-off required confirming that staff have read and understood the policy.
  • Provision of training. Again, this should be rolled out company-wide, and conducted on a regular basis. It is important that there is general awareness, not only of what is defined to be sexual harassment, but an understanding of what rights and remedies are available to those who feel that they have been a victim of this type of harassment.
  • Encouraging a positive workplace environment. By implementing the above steps, a positive environment will be fostered, which will also encourage staff at all levels to be proactive about preventing sexual harassment or calling it out when it occurs.

the need for employer action

In addition to the general requirement to provide safe working conditions for staff, there are other positive obligations on employers in relation to sexual harassment.

For example, in Victoria, the Equal Opportunity Act 2010 (VIC) imposes a positive duty on employers to prevent any sort of sexual harassment from occurring.

Similarly, employers Australia-wide may be deemed to be vicariously liable for the conduct of their employees, if it can be demonstrated that they did not take reasonable steps to prevent sexual harassment (per the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth)).

In order to protect the business, it is crucial that immediate and appropriate action by way of response to a sexual harassment notification occurs. Training managers and staff about sexual harassment and the company's stance on it is vital.

Sexual harassment in the workplace continues to be a great concern for both employees and employers. Taking active steps and educating staff is crucial in reducing the prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace. Accordingly, WISE Workplace offers employers training programs to address and investigate workplace sexual harassment, as well as independent investigation services to review such behaviours. 


Gender Equality: How to Create a Win-Win in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, March 13, 2019

It can seem unbelievable that gender inequality persists in Australian workplaces in 2019. As well as the obvious human rights issues, some employers and managers fail to comprehend that a lack of gender equality can have measurable negative consequences for the organisation as a whole. 

Let's examine some of the alarming statistics around the situation for women in the workplace, the benefits of championing gender equality, and some of the more positive approaches that can be taken by organisations to create a win-win situation.

inequality - some sobering statistics

To fully understand gender inequality in Australian workplaces, it can help to absorb some of the bald statistics. Women across the Australian workforce are paid 15.3% less than men for equivalent work, and accumulate less than half the superannuation. They have a 50% chance of experiencing sexual harassment in the workplace, and the same odds of experiencing discrimination on the basis of being a parent! 

Barriers to gender equality in the workplace can be both subtle and not-so-subtle. Positional bias and diminished responsibility stem from the idea that only one gender or the other is 'right' for a job, such as reception work or heavy lifting. Subtler barriers see women being asked about family issues at job interviews - and yet not men. 

Other barriers include a lack of targeted support to help women overcome the promotional glass ceiling. For example, if the ability to act in higher positions, attend training or to network with stakeholders is not made sufficiently flexible for women in the workplace, then that glass ceiling will undoubtedly stay firmly in place.

WHy it's vital to rectify workplace gender inequality 

As indicated, these practices of gender inequality are deeply unacceptable on human rights grounds alone. Yet there is also a strong business case to be made for rectifying this situation and making gender equality a key component of business-as-usual. 

Firstly, fostering a level playing field in the workplace creates a sense of certainty and loyalty among all staff. The subsequent improvement in staff retention reduces the costs and inconvenience of rehiring and retraining. It also creates a more harmonious corporate environment due to reduced staffing changes. 

And - as if these benefits to business weren't enough - workplace gender equality enables longitudinal corporate knowledge to be more easily captured and retained. 

devEloping a high-quality business reputation

Reputational benefits also flow to those organisations that actively embrace equality for women in the workplace. For example, the prestigious Employer of Choice Awards in Australia recognises and promotes businesses that demonstrate practical gains in workplace gender equality. Reputational gains lead to the attraction and retention of high quality staff. 

fostering gender equality in your workplace

Many organisations have the best of intentions when it comes to improving gender equality. However sometimes it can be challenging to know where to start. A workplace audit of current equality initiatives can help to pinpoint any gaps - particularly between lip service and actual practice. From here, robust policies for parental leave and support, career assistance and flexible work arrangements can form an excellent base for the improvement of workplace gender equality on the ground. 

A strong framework for workplace gender equality

Being a leader in workplace gender equality brings considerable gains in employee satisfaction, reputation and the bottom line. It also works to lessen the chances of expensive claims being made on the basis of alleged gender discrimination. 

At WISE Workplace, we pride ourselves on the assistance that we provide to employers in their pursuit of excellence. We have the experience and governance expertise to help organisations remedy risks and work towards excellence in workplace gender equality. Get in touch if you would like to discuss the best ways to create equality in the workplace for women - and indeed for all employees.