How to Truly Relax Over the Summer Holidays

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Christmas tree is up, the fairy lights are lit, the bonbons are set on the table, the trifle is in the fridge - and you are sifting through your phone, replying to just one more email, tweaking just one more slide on the Powerpoint, making just one more phone call to a prospective client. Happy holidays, right? 

If this resembled your Christmas, you're not alone. Nearly 73% of Australians continue to work in some way while they are on leave. This figure is sure to continue rising, as thanks to email, text and social media, people are now contactable 24/7, no matter where they are in the world. 

So, a very modern question - is it possible to have a true break from work, relax fully, and not worry about what might be awaiting you when you return?

it's all about PREPARATION

The key is to organise things before you go away, so that you're in the right headspace to relax and revitalise. 

Top tips to prepare for your holiday break include:  

  • Plan ahead - prepare a list of issues that might come up while you are away and assign them to people who will be working. If necessary, arrange for the relevant people to have access to your emails or your mailbox so that important correspondence can be dealt with in your absence. 
  • Ensure that people you work with, and people you deal with externally, are aware that you are going on leave, and when you will be back. It also helps to give several weeks' notice that you will be away, so that you are not inundated with requests on your way out the door. 
  • Keep a few clear days before you head off on holidays to deal with last-minute issues and put out fires as necessary.
  • Organise yourself so that you have the items requiring your top attention ready to deal with as soon as you return. 

Once you walk out of the workplace, switch off!

Turn off the phone, turn off the emails, and don't check in - relax and enjoy your time off. In almost every case, things will keep going without you. 

Stuck at work?

Of course, not all of us get time off over the summer period. 

If you do have to work through, try to: 

  • Plan your days to maximise what you can achieve, while still allowing time to re-focus. Make sure you take a lunch break, or find some time to stretch your legs.
  • Keep a positive attitude towards having to be at work - someone will benefit from you being there to help!
  • Motivate yourself by planning a break or some time off as a reward after the busy summer holiday season, even if it is just time spent with family at home. 

managing your stress levels is also key to relaxing

While we're all very familiar with the term, what exactly is meant by "stress"? Stress sparks the fight or flight response, preparing the body for action against a potential threat. Adrenaline and cortisol are released, resulting in a speeding up of the heart rate, metabolism and breathing rate. 

Once, this fight or flight response might have kicked in with a mammoth chasing you across the tundra, but in the modern workplace, it's much more likely to result from your supervisor imposing a tight deadline, or dealing with an angry client or a hundred "urgent" emails! 

Stress is largely inevitable, whether you're dealing with issues at work or navigating long holiday queues at the airport. In many ways, it is an acceptable part of modern living - so long as it is managed correctly. 

The stress response can be helpful in the short-term, but long-term, it can have negative effects on your health. Stress can lead to a variety of conditions including fatigue, high blood pressure and depression. 

how mindfulness can help you deal with stress 

A recent buzzword in human resources and psychology, mindfulness is a useful technique for reducing stress. Mindfulness can help you manage your workload better, improve your concentration, increase relaxation and promote self-awareness. 

It involves reflection, prioritisation and listening, without distractions. It means being present in the moment, thinking only of the task at hand, and re-focusing on your work and its purpose. 

There are a number of mindfulness techniques you can try, including mediation, paying attention to your breathing and progressively relaxing your muscles. 

So whether you are working through or taking time off these holidays, make 2018 the year you return to the workplace relaxed and re-focused, and better able to manage stress! 

And if you'd like to get your 2018 off on the right start, we have training programs available to ensure your workplace investigation is as stress free as possible.  

Workplace Party Pitfalls and Perils (A Christmas Story)

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, November 15, 2017

At a time when workers increasingly work remotely, communicate online or use hot desks, the annual staff Christmas party is a valuable opportunity to get everyone interacting face to face. 

A Christmas party is also a good way of getting staff who rarely see one another during the working week to meet, to reward staff for hard work, to celebrate the success of the past year, and to motivate employees for the year ahead. 

At the same time, it is essential that reasonable steps are taken to manage the risk to the organisation's reputation, to provide an environment free from discrimination and to protect the health and safety of all involved in the Christmas party. 

Small wonder then that there is a fine line between potentially permitting a situation to get out of hand, and being so risk averse that you kill the fun of the party altogether. 

Here's a quick guide for employees and employers on how to avoid the potential perils of the work Christmas party.

when is a party classed as a workplace event?

First, in order for a business to be legally liable for events that occur at a Christmas party, it must be considered a 'workplace event'. However, this can extend beyond something which is specifically labelled an 'end of year function' or 'Christmas party', and can include something as informal as a picnic or a sporting activity - or even an unplanned and spontaneous event like an after party. 

The factors that determine whether something is defined as a workplace event include:

  • Whether the employer sponsored or funded the event.
  • If the employer was involved in organising the event or issued invitations.
  • Whether attendance was voluntary or whether the employer expected attendance - for example, by requiring employees who did not attend to take annual leave or work instead. 
  • If employees consider it a 'perk' of employment to attend the event.
  • Whether the employer benefitted from the event, for example by having the opportunity to present awards or network with clients.  

SO HOW CAN THINGS GO WRONG?

Some notable mishaps from past Christmas parties include: 

  • The dismissal of an employee for haranguing and then pushing a fully clothed co-worker into a swimming pool. That decision was upheld by the Fair Work Commission, despite noting that the employer should not have provided virtually unlimited alcohol. Another factor was that the employee was asked to leave by the general manager, but refused to do so, engaging in a physical altercation with him. 
  • An employee urinating off a balcony on Darling Harbour onto dining patrons below was sacked for misconduct. 
  • A formal warning was given to a police officer who used a genital piercing to open beer bottles during a party. 
  • Another employee lost his job after faking his wife's illness to miss his own Christmas party - only to attend that of a competitor.   

how employees can have fun and stay out of trouble

There are a few important things employees should be aware of: 

  • What happens at the party will almost certainly not stay at the party. Quite apart from water-cooler gossip and the potential repercussions of people remembering what you said or did after that fifth glass of wine, there's also potential for humiliating photographs or embarrassing posts to be shared on social media. 
  • Employees should set and stick to limits. Good working relationships can be quickly destroyed, and respect lost, through foolish or careless behaviour by those who have over-imbibed. 
  • Once your reputation has been damaged, it can be incredibly difficult to repair it. Remember that you will need to see your colleagues and any other guests again - if not on Monday, certainly after the Christmas break. 

Instead of overdoing the alcohol, use the party as an opportunity to network with other people in your organisation whom you may not know as well. The Christmas party should be an opportunity to have fun and form more personal connections, with a view to improving your overall work life.

WHAT EMPLOYERS MUST DO

In order to minimise any potential pitfalls from the Christmas party, employers need to know a few key things:

  • If a function is deemed to be a workplace event, then the employer owes a duty of care to employees. This includes being held vicariously responsible for any injuries, discrimination, harassment, or potentially for anything the employees do wrong, such as breakages. 
  • Service of alcohol is the responsibility of the employer. Although employees should feel free to have a good time without undue restrictions, it is up to the employer to ensure that nobody is excessively intoxicated. Some employers may also wish to provide alternative transport home, such as Cabcharge vouchers. 
  • Employers should make it clear exactly when the function starts and finishes. Setting a specific end time for the festivities assists with limiting the employer's duty of care to a finite window, after which point anything that happens at a different venue could be considered to be 'off the clock'. 
  • Employees should be reminded that, even though the event may not be held at the workplace, the usual rules of conduct apply. This includes reminding employees of the company's sexual harassment, bullying and anti-discrimination policies. 
  • Remind employees to be culturally sensitive, especially noting that not all people celebrate Christmas, and ensure that any gifts sanctioned at the workplace event, such as Secret Santa, are not inappropriate or offensive. 

How to deal with any misconduct 

If something does go wrong at the Christmas party, it is important for employers to deal with potential misconduct swiftly and fairly in order to minimise any fallout. WISE Workplace can assist with a professional and unbiased workplace investigation. 

Professional Distance and Social Media

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Maintaining professional distance in the workplace can be challenging at the best of times. There is a very fine line between managing interpersonal relationships, ensuring that colleagues and co-workers get along with each other, and developing such close relationships that potential conflicts of interest or social problems arise. 

This juggle has become even more difficult with the advent of social media, which can blur that fine line, and complicate relationships in a whole new range of ways.

Types of social media platforms   

Social media has evolved from the early networks, like MySpace or MSN to a whole range of different platforms. There are now professional networking sites, such as LinkedIn, image-sharing sites such as Instagram or Snapchat (where images self-destruct after a certain time) and platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google and Whatsapp etc. for social interaction. 

positive use of social media in the workplace

As with any other tool, there are some positive uses for social media in the workplace. Professional networking sites such as LinkedIn, can be a helpful way to connect with likeminded professionals, or introduce co-workers to other people whose interests may be professionally aligned. 

Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook allow businesses to share news or promote themselves, or permit staff members in different geographical locations to stay in touch. Indeed, many large companies use personalised social media tools such as Yammer to enable staff throughout the organisation to communicate internally. 

when is social media use inappropriate?

Unfortunately, social media can also be misused in the workplace context. In many situations, it is not colleagues being 'friends' on social media that is the main issue, but rather the dissemination of too much information, inappropriate content or the sharing of information with an inappropriate audience. 

It is easy to over-share on social media, forget who the information is potentially accessible to, and the fact that it is often permanent once it is shared. 

Types of inappropriate social media use may include:

  • Posting negative or offensive comments about co-workers, employers, or the workplace (especially if the person posting the comments does not consider who their contacts and potential readers include)
  • Sharing excessively personal information, either about themselves, or other people, which removes professionalism or an ability to maintain a professional distance from co-workers. 
  • Posting comments which could potentially negatively affect the reputation of the employer or co-workers
  • Sharing confidential information concerning clients, co-workers and pending or current contracts/agreements
  • Creating circumstances whereby colleagues may start to dislike each other. For example, it is likely to be completely irrelevant to a working relationship whether a colleague supports the current Prime Minister, or has a particular religious affiliation, but sharing polarising views on social media could cause work relationships to fracture. 

Walking the line

The most significant misuse of social media in the workplace arises from the potential for the professional lines to be blurred - including where inappropriately close, possibly sexual or romantic relationships form. This is especially important in situations where there is a power imbalance - for example, between a manager and a staff member, a teacher and a student, or a treating doctor or psychologist and their patient. 

In these circumstances, it is likely best to avoid a social media 'friendship' completely, in order to ensure that the appropriate professional distance is maintained.

why workplaces need social media guidelines

Employers should have clear policies in place which set out the rules and obligations for employees interacting with colleagues or mentioning the workplace on social media, and the consequences for a breach of the policy. 

A coherent and well-communicated policy can prevent or limit the fallout from many of the issues associated with a failure to maintain professional distance. 

If you are seeking advice on implementing a social media policy, or you require a workplace investigation into a potential conflict of interest or inappropriate relationship or misuse of social media, we can help. WISE Workplace offers both full and supported investigations. You can also find out more about the issues involved in maintaining professional distance here.  

Professional Distance and Conflict of Interest at Work

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, September 20, 2017

During the seventies and eighties, organisations started to realise that the improper use of power and authority and undeclared and/or ineffectively managed conflicts of interest, posed a significant risk to their integrity and public trust. 

The requirement for ethical business dealings focuses the spotlight on conflicts of interests and the factors involved in creating the perception of conflicts of interest in the workplace. 

It can be difficult to maintain a suitable professional distance with colleagues, subordinates and suppliers, particularly if a significant friendships have been formed outside the workplace. There is an increased risk when managers, employees and co-workers communicate on social media. Employers must also be vigilant about the risks of inappropriate levels of professional distance with clients or colleagues, especially in circumstances where such behaviour may lead to, or can be perceived as, grooming of vulnerable persons. 

When it comes to conflicts of interest, it is best to completely avoid any behaviour, which may result in the creation of a real or perceived conflict of interest. For this reason, many professions address this specifically in their Codes of Conduct or may draft specific conflict of interest policies, which set out expected and appropriate standards of behaviour. 

In our planned six-part series we'll unpack the key elements of professional distance and conflict of interest, from maintaining professional boundaries to determining the difference between a lapse of judgement and grooming. 

breaching professional boundaries   

According to Dr. Anna Corbo Crehan, from the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the University of Melbourne, questions of professional distance occur when two or more people involved in a professional relationship also have an additional relationship, such as one based on love, attraction, friendship or family. "So then, professional distance is the space a professional must keep between their professional relationship with another, and any other relationship they have with that person. By keeping this space, a professional can fulfil their professional and personal obligations, and be seen to do so, in a way that is impartial and/or non-exploitative in regard to the other in the relationship", she says. 

Breaching professional boundaries can also refer to the failure to manage conflicts of interest. A particularly close relationship between co-workers, especially those involving persons in a position of authority, may create the perception (whether real or imagined) of inappropriate work-related benefits or advantages being bestowed on a close associate because of the friendship. 

The most common types of conflict of interest are financial, such as where a monetary advantage is bestowed or a financial saving made, and personal, where a clear benefit is provided to the recipient such as a promotion or an opportunity for advancement or training and development. 

The best way to avoid perceived conflicts of interest is by maintaining clear professional boundaries, especially by those in a position of power, such as employers, supervisors, managers, or instructors. In extreme circumstances it may be prudent to completely avoid forming any relationships with colleagues outside of work.

codes of conduct and different professions 

Many professions abide by specific Codes of Conduct, which set out and govern acceptable standards of behaviour in their specific industry and provide comprehensive guidelines as to what is considered appropriately maintained levels of professional distance in that industry. 

For example, an inappropriate level of closeness may mean one thing in the context of a school teacher, and another thing in the context of a physical therapist. Professions such as nursing, teaching and social work need to have an additional emphasis on protecting vulnerable persons (such as children, the elderly, the disabled, of the mentally ill) from unscrupulous persons of the effects of inappropriately close relationships. 

In other professions, such as aged care or legal services, it is vital that professional distance is maintained to avoid any perception (whether actual or imagined) of financial abuse and conflicts of interest, when a client confers excessive financial benefits on the service provider. 

One recent example of a breach of an industry specific Code of Conduct involved a police officer who sold confidential information and provided accident locations to a tow truck driver, who gained a financial advantage from arriving on the scene ahead of competitors. 

On many occasions, a failure to maintain an appropriate professional distance occurs inadvertently or without any intentional wrongdoing. While it is beneficial for colleagues to develop good relationships with their co-workers, it is important for all employees to be able to maintain a perception of professional distance so that it does not appear as though they are incapable of making impartial business related decisions. 

professional distance and social media 

In the modern workplace, social media has become a virtually omnipresent phenomenon. With the advent of many different types of social media platforms, including LinkedIn and Facebook, there are many opportunities for workers to remain connected. 

Most employers recognise that social media is a platform that is both complimentary to, and additional to, other methods of communication and engagement used by them. Most employers also understand the beneficial networking functions of social media, particularly in the case of LinkedIn, however there is a far greater risk of boundaries being crossed or lines being blurred when communicating through social media. 

There can be particular difficulties in utilising social media when dealing with vulnerable people such as students, the disabled or persons with mental health issues. As a general rule, it is inappropriate for work colleagues or employers to share overly personal information or material on social media. Most workplaces have a clearly set-out social media policy. It is important that employees are made aware of its contents and application and are encouraged to use social media in a responsible, reasonable and ethical manner, in accordance with the employer's Code of Conduct. 

Broadly, if content is critical of a colleague, affects his/her reputation, is personal, hurtful, potentially embarrassing to a co-worker, or otherwise inappropriate, it could easily breach the requirements of professional distance.   

determining grooming, or an error of judgement. 

An important aspect of maintaining professional distance involves taking steps to avoid situations where it could be perceived that 'grooming' is taking place. This is essential not just in the context of children, but other people who are deemed to be vulnerable, including the elderly, those with disabilities, or those involved in situations where there is a power imbalance. 

The act of grooming is a criminal offence in many Australian states. It is a term which generally refers to deliberate and sustained contact with a vulnerable person in order to obtain their trust and prepare them to participate in the groomer's intended purpose, which may be sexually, financially or otherwise motivated. 

As a responsible employer, if somebody reports concerns about potential grooming, or you observe the possibility of such behaviour occurring, it is important that a workplace investigation is conducted to determine whether the contact is in fact grooming, or merely represents a lapse in judgement.

Dealing with a breach of boundaries 

The best litmus test when assessing appropriate levels of professional distance between managers and employees, between co-workers or between employees and clients, is whether there could, in the view of a reasonable person, be a perception of inappropriate behaviour, conflict of interest, favouritism, nepotism, or even grooming. 

If there is any possibility that such assumptions could be made, then it is likely that professional boundaries are being crossed. 

If you have doubts regarding a potential conflict of interest or breach of professional distance, then it is best to get an impartial third party to investigate. Our services include full and supported workplace investigations and training. Contact WISE Workplace today to find out how we can best be of assistance.

From Cyberspace to Head Space

Harriet Witchell - Monday, October 05, 2015
Workplace bullying spills over to cyberspace

So much of our lives are lived online these days, and even workplace bullying has made the leap to cyberspace. As one recent case before the Fair Work Commission (FWC) illustrates, employers need to be vigilant about what happens both in the office and online, as bullying spills beyond the boundaries of the physical workplace and on to social media.  

A case with a social media aspecT

In late September 2015, the FWC issued a stop bullying order in response to an application made by a Tasmanian real estate property consultant. She alleged that she had been bullied by the sales administrator Mrs Bird (who was also one of the owners of the business), almost from the commencement of her employment in May 2014.   

In one key incident, there was an impromptu meeting between Mrs Bird and the applicant, in which Mrs Bird accused her of being disrespectful and undermining her authority. Mrs Bird said the applicant was a “naughty little schoolgirl running to the teacher.”   The applicant tried to leave the room but Mrs Bird stood in the doorway, blocking her path. The applicant was humiliated and distressed and left the office to compose herself. While she was out, she checked her Facebook account and discovered that Mrs Bird had unfriended her. Shortly afterwards, the applicant took two weeks’ sick leave, followed by a workers’ compensation claim. 

The FWC found that found that Mrs Bird’s schoolgirl comment was “provocative and disobliging” and that the Facebook unfriending showed a “lack of emotional maturity and [was] indicative of unreasonable behaviour.”   

The applicant had been diagnosed with depression and anxiety for which she was being medicated and treated by a psychologist. The FWC found that Mrs Bird’s conduct posed a risk to the applicant’s health and safety. The FWC was satisfied that bullying had occurred and there was a risk that it would continue. Even though the employer had recently implemented an anti-bullying policy and manual, Mrs Bird and the employer had failed to appreciate the seriousness of the conduct.   

The FWC issued a stop bullying order, and referred the matter to a conference to be resolved.

Use of social media in workplace bullying

In 2014, the NSW District Court determined that cyberbullying could happen anywhere, not just in the physical work environment. The court was considering a case in which a teacher was suing a former student for defamation after the former student posted a series of defamatory tweets on Twitter.   

This highlights the need for employers to take immediate action if employees are found to be posting negative or defamatory comments on social media, regardless of whether the comments are about other employees, or external people or organisations.

The impacts of cyberbullying

Cyberbullying can impact an organisation in a number of ways, including:   

  • Management time spent investigating and managing complaints. 
  • Management time spent in FWC hearings. 
  • Increased employee sick leave and decreased productivity. 
  • Risk of workers’ compensation claims. 
  •  Increased friction between staff.   

Workplace cyberbullying should also be taken seriously because the employee can be exposed to the information online at any time – at work or at home. In other words, they have no escape.   

Psychological health is also a huge factor in workplace bullying and this case shows the psychological damage that bullying did to the applicant, exacerbated by the Facebook unfriending.  

The psychological impacts of bullying can include:   

  • Depression. 
  • Anxiety. 
  • Low self-esteem. 
  • Panic Attacks. 
  • Fatigue. 
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 
  • Suicidal thoughts.
Employer duty of care

Employers have a duty under occupational health and safety laws to provide a safe workplace for all employees. This includes a workplace that is free from bullying. Even though the FWC considered that the bullying of the applicant in this case posed a risk to her health and safety, it was concerning that the employer failed to recognise the seriousness of the conduct.   

Workplace bullying is no joke, as demonstrated by this case. It highlights the psychological impact of bullying and shows how social media can inflame the situation. Employers must be vigilant in monitoring the online activities of employees and educating them about appropriate conduct. This starts with a comprehensive policy and training. Employers should also take complaints seriously and investigate them thoroughly.   

The prevalence of social media use means that bullying issues have become far more complex to investigate and manage. If you have or suspect a bullying issue in your workplace, or would like assistance in writing guidelines or investigating complaints, contact us.

Teacher Awarded Compensation over Twitter Defamation

Harriet Witchell - Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Workplace harassment can happen in a number of different environments, not just in the office as was upheld by a recent ruling in the NSW district court. In the first case of its kind, NSW teacher Christine Mickle successfully sued a former student for defamation via popular social media platform Twitter. The student was ordered to pay $105,000 in compensation for comments made on Twitter and Facebook.

Workplace harassment and bullying are a real issue for many employees. It can be extremely distressing for employees to be victims of bullying in the workplace but when this continues online over social media it can be even more devastating. Being harassed over the internet means that employees have no escape from bullying, even when they are at home, and with the widespread use of smartphones, negative and derogatory comments can follow them around wherever they go. The Twitter defamation case demonstrates that workplace harassment via social media is actionable and can have serious financial consequences for those who engage in it so it’s important that it is taken seriously.

Cyber bullying has been in the media for a number of reasons recently with calls for stricter laws governing the behaviour of cyber bullies and trolls along with increased awareness of the effect this type of harassment has on victims. In the case of Mrs Mickle, the effects of the defamation were described as ‘devastating’ and resulted in her taking an extended period of sick leave and only returning to work on a limited basis.

What is defamation?
The law regarding defamation is most commonly thought of in relation to media organisations and newspapers who publish false or negative information but the law can equally be applied to businesses and other organisations. Defamation is the publication or dissemination of false information which could damage another person’s reputation.
It’s very important for businesses and other organisations to be aware of the potential for defamation and be extremely careful when posting anything about another organisation or a current or former employee. Material posted on social media networks can be seen as defamatory if it:
  • Says that someone is dishonest or disloyal.
  • Makes personal statements about them which could cause someone else to think less of them.
  • Accuses them of doing something they didn’t.
  • Makes negative assertions about their capability of doing their job.

To count as defamation something doesn’t have to be overtly untrue, it can be argued that a statement which makes implications can also be considered to be defamation.

Make employees aware of the risks of social media
If you hear complaints that employees are posting negative comments about their co-workers on social media it’s important to take the allegations seriously. Social media harassment and defamation can lead to serious consequences for individuals and organisations. Make sure your employees are aware of the consequences of talking negatively about each other on Twitter or Facebook and help create a culture that discourages social media harassment and bullying to make your organisation a safer and healthier environment for everyone.

Use of social media records as evidence of misconduct

Harriet Witchell - Tuesday, November 05, 2013

There is no doubt that social media is playing an increasing role in our lives.  

Have you ever been handed a folder of print outs from Facebook and told; “Here you go, I want this person out!”?

An increasing number of organisations are developing social media policies as a starting point to control inappropriate staff interaction online, but the question still arises: ‘how do you prove that someone has breached the policy?’

Where do you start?

Initial questions that need to be asked include;  What was said?  Is it work-related?  Who wrote it? At first glance, the latter question may seem obvious, but in more than one case, someone impersonating someone else has posted comments. To take effective administrative action, you must “prove” who made these comments. This is known as “attribution of the records”.

In a recent case conducted by Access Forensics, alternate records from the social media site identified the true author of the comments and a just outcome was achieved.

In another case, a client became concerned with internet records which appeared to suggest excessive use of the company’s IT system to visit social media sites.  However, closer inspection confirmed that most records were generated as a result of automatic processes not initiated by the user, nor as a result of visiting the social media site.

To effectively attribute a digital record to a particular author, it’s imperative that the investigator uses good, old fashioned interviewing skills, to question the alleged author about the creation of the social media post. They should also collect other sources of evidence and circumstances surrounding the case, to avoid attributing the post to the wrong person.

So what do you need from your Facebook printouts?
  • The name of the person who saw the comments on Facebook
  • The name of the account where they were seen
  • The time and date of printing off the posts
  • The name of who did the printing
  • A description of how they did the printing

All this information can be easily obtained in a statement that should accompany the Facebook pages and give credibility to the source of the evidence. These steps won’t prove who said what, but they will give weight to the evidence that you have.

Written by Harriet Stacey of WISE Workplace in collaboration with Clinton Towers, of Access Forensics

WISE now on Facebook

Harriet Stacey - Wednesday, May 25, 2011
You can now find us on Facebook!