The Cost of Aggressive Leaders

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 24, 2018

There are many different skills which are required for an effective leader - such as excellent communication skills, perseverance, the ability to inspire and motivate staff, clarity of thought, and efficiency. But one detrimental trait that many leaders may possess is aggression.

Although it is often accepted that a domineering personality seems to go hand in hand with successful leadership, in many situations it can actually get in the way of optimal and effective management.

a bad habit or a behavioural strength? 

There are different levels on the scale of aggression - and indeed, for some jobs a level of combativeness is almost an essential quality. From a CEO accustomed to facilitating hostile takeovers, to a litigator who must take charge of a courtroom, to a police officer, in these careers, behavioural traits which are more closely aligned with aggression can be helpful. 

Contrast this with "softer" jobs, such as a primary school teacher, a nurse, a psychologist or a social worker, and it becomes apparent that certain personality traits are much better suited to some industries than others. 

Hiring managers and HR managers responsible for recruitment and selection of managers need to be aware of the difference between simple assertiveness and unbridled aggression or even narcissism.

the difference between assertive and aggressive

A "positive" and assertive boss might:

  • Engage in competition against external competitors, but support a whole team ethos;
  • Be forthright and open, including potentially critical - but be equally willing to accept criticism of their own methods;
  • Seek facts;
  • Respect the rights of staff to their own opinions. 

In comparison, a "negative" aggressive or narcissistic boss may:

  • Constantly compete with their own staff;
  • Belittle or punish those who disagree with the leader;
  • Base decisions on their emotions or feelings rather than rational or logical conclusions;
  • Mock or otherwise put down staff; 
  • Yell, gesture, stride around or otherwise engage in physically intimidating behaviours.

the downsides of aggressive behaviour in the workforce

In its most basic form, employees who work for aggressive leaders can be uninspired and unhappy, often not wishing to come to work. A leader who storms around like a bear with a sore head, as the expression goes, is likely to cause, or at the very least contribute to, a toxic workplace. 

This, in turn, can lead to significant losses in productivity, high rates of absenteeism or presenteeism (where staff physically turn up but do not properly fulfil their duties) and excessive staff turnover. 

changing leadership behaviour 

It can be difficult to modify leadership behaviour, particularly when it comes to leaders with type-A personalities, which will likely mean that they are reluctant to accept criticism or receive feedback well. 

Strategies for changing leadership behaviour, or at least improving the ability of staff to deal with aggressive leaders, include:

  • Building a strong relationship between the leader and the rest of their team, including by encouraging open communication and fostering the ability for human resources staff as well as team members to provide feedback on decisions made by the leader. 
  • Appeal to the leader's sense of logic and highlight the potential impact of their actions on the business.
  • In the case of narcissistic leaders, it can be helpful to frame feedback on their behaviour in terms of how it might negatively affect their goals, rather than as a direct personal criticism.
  • Stop supporting this type of behaviour by refusing to promote or reward leaders who are aggressive, and who refuse help to modify their behaviour. 

Taking a few simple steps towards correcting the ongoing behaviour of an aggressive leader, while still highlighting the importance of strength in decision-making, can help to significantly improve the satisfaction, productivity and quality of your workers. If you believe you have an aggressive leader or a toxic workplace where an investigation or cultural review would help, contact WISE today for an obligation free quote. 

Tackling a Toxic Workplace Culture

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Many people start off each year with a bundle of resolutions - to eat better, to exercise more, to spend more time with the kids... the list goes on. The start of a new calendar year is also a fantastic time for businesses to take stock and reassess. If your workplace culture is getting in the way of your business fulfilling it's potential, make change your top New Year's resolution for 2018.

what is workplace culture? 

Culture is loosely defined as the beliefs and behaviours that govern how people act in an organisation. 

While it is often considered to be a vague concept, how workers interact with each other is an incredibly important part of work life. Good organisational culture is now believed to be a key factor in a business' success or failure. 

If staff feel uncomfortable, unhappy or excluded, they will obviously not enjoy coming to work - which generally means that they will be less motivated, less productive and reluctant to go beyond the call of duty when asked.

how to identify if your workplace culture is bad

Whether a workplace is toxic or not is difficult to define. Generally speaking, if people are unhappy at work more often than not, you are dealing with a poor workplace culture. 

Factors that can contribute to a toxic culture include:

  • Staff not being trusted to take calculated risks or perform their jobs without being micromanaged.
  • Workers constantly being asked to perform under significant pressure and without adequate resources being allocated to assist them.
  • A lack of clarity or top-down direction.
  • Poor leadership behaviour or interaction 

what happens when workplace cultures are toxic

Toxic cultures can breed hostile, pessimistic team members, drive away top talent and prevent organisations from reaching their full potential. 

Some signs and consequences of toxicity include:

  • Increasing staff conflict
  • High staff turnover
  • High levels of absenteeism
  • Presenteeism (where people physically show up at work, but don't perform their duties to the best of their abilities)
  • Increased workers' compensation claims
  • Complaints of bullying or other types of harassment 

HOW to chage a negative workplace culture

In order to address workplace toxicity, employers need to be prepared to tackle issues head-on. 

These 10 steps towards changing workplace culture for the better can help make the task less daunting.

  1. Identify and assess the underlying problems. This is best achieved by issuing a staff survey, conducting exit interviews to determine why staff are leaving, or otherwise encouraging open and honest feedback. 
  2. Establish a concrete company vision. Ensure that all employees are engaged with the vision and understand where the business is headed.
  3. Rinse and repeat - ideally, make sure that surveys and opinion polls are conducted on a regular basis to identify what factors may be improving or worsening the workplace culture.
  4. Encourage consultation and open communication. In addition to helping filter ideas and feedback up to the leadership team, this makes staff feel valued and assists in reducing emotions such as frustration or anger.
  5. Facilitate friendships and encourage team building. If your staff actually like each other, they are much more likely to take additional steps to support co-workers and the business. 
  6. Be consistent and fair. One of the biggest gripes of staff who feel they operate in a toxic environment is that their supervisors seem to change attitudes on a regular basis, or that responses are likely to vary depending on what mood the boss is in. 
  7. Maintain a sense of fun - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, as the saying goes, and creating a workplace where staff feel at home is much more likely to improve morale. 
  8. Pick your team wisely. When selecting and hiring new staff, consider how they will fit into the team and how they will get on with your other workers.
  9. Be physically present. Although senior staff will doubtless have different hours and regimes to stick to than average workers, it is disheartening to see supervisors roll in regularly at 11am with coffee in hand, head out for long lunches and then leave in the early afternoon. Allow your staff to see that you are working just as hard as they are. 
  10. Recognise the efforts of staff. Whether this is through an employee of the month program, an annual awards dinner or simply ongoing quiet acknowledgement of good performance, ensure that staff know they are appreciated. 

So, start this year the right way - make your workplace somewhere your staff want to be, instead of somewhere they have to be. And if you're having difficultly with a toxic workplace culture, WISE can help, through out investigation, mediation and governance services. 

How to Truly Relax Over the Summer Holidays

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Christmas tree is up, the fairy lights are lit, the bonbons are set on the table, the trifle is in the fridge - and you are sifting through your phone, replying to just one more email, tweaking just one more slide on the Powerpoint, making just one more phone call to a prospective client. Happy holidays, right? 

If this resembled your Christmas, you're not alone. Nearly 73% of Australians continue to work in some way while they are on leave. This figure is sure to continue rising, as thanks to email, text and social media, people are now contactable 24/7, no matter where they are in the world. 

So, a very modern question - is it possible to have a true break from work, relax fully, and not worry about what might be awaiting you when you return?

it's all about PREPARATION

The key is to organise things before you go away, so that you're in the right headspace to relax and revitalise. 

Top tips to prepare for your holiday break include:  

  • Plan ahead - prepare a list of issues that might come up while you are away and assign them to people who will be working. If necessary, arrange for the relevant people to have access to your emails or your mailbox so that important correspondence can be dealt with in your absence. 
  • Ensure that people you work with, and people you deal with externally, are aware that you are going on leave, and when you will be back. It also helps to give several weeks' notice that you will be away, so that you are not inundated with requests on your way out the door. 
  • Keep a few clear days before you head off on holidays to deal with last-minute issues and put out fires as necessary.
  • Organise yourself so that you have the items requiring your top attention ready to deal with as soon as you return. 

Once you walk out of the workplace, switch off!

Turn off the phone, turn off the emails, and don't check in - relax and enjoy your time off. In almost every case, things will keep going without you. 

Stuck at work?

Of course, not all of us get time off over the summer period. 

If you do have to work through, try to: 

  • Plan your days to maximise what you can achieve, while still allowing time to re-focus. Make sure you take a lunch break, or find some time to stretch your legs.
  • Keep a positive attitude towards having to be at work - someone will benefit from you being there to help!
  • Motivate yourself by planning a break or some time off as a reward after the busy summer holiday season, even if it is just time spent with family at home. 

managing your stress levels is also key to relaxing

While we're all very familiar with the term, what exactly is meant by "stress"? Stress sparks the fight or flight response, preparing the body for action against a potential threat. Adrenaline and cortisol are released, resulting in a speeding up of the heart rate, metabolism and breathing rate. 

Once, this fight or flight response might have kicked in with a mammoth chasing you across the tundra, but in the modern workplace, it's much more likely to result from your supervisor imposing a tight deadline, or dealing with an angry client or a hundred "urgent" emails! 

Stress is largely inevitable, whether you're dealing with issues at work or navigating long holiday queues at the airport. In many ways, it is an acceptable part of modern living - so long as it is managed correctly. 

The stress response can be helpful in the short-term, but long-term, it can have negative effects on your health. Stress can lead to a variety of conditions including fatigue, high blood pressure and depression. 

how mindfulness can help you deal with stress 

A recent buzzword in human resources and psychology, mindfulness is a useful technique for reducing stress. Mindfulness can help you manage your workload better, improve your concentration, increase relaxation and promote self-awareness. 

It involves reflection, prioritisation and listening, without distractions. It means being present in the moment, thinking only of the task at hand, and re-focusing on your work and its purpose. 

There are a number of mindfulness techniques you can try, including mediation, paying attention to your breathing and progressively relaxing your muscles. 

So whether you are working through or taking time off these holidays, make 2018 the year you return to the workplace relaxed and re-focused, and better able to manage stress! 

And if you'd like to get your 2018 off on the right start, we have training programs available to ensure your workplace investigation is as stress free as possible.