How to Handle Workplace Bullying

Is bullying a problem in your workplace? According to a regulation impact statement produced by Safe Work Australia, the prevalence of bullying in Australian workplaces is between 3.5 and 21%. The cost of bullying to businesses in terms of lost productivity and absenteeism amounts to millions of dollars every year, and being a victim of bullying can affect the physical and mental health of employees.

If you suspect bullying is a problem in your workplace, it’s important that the problem is addressed, but how do you tackle it without making things worse or aggravating the situation further? Here are a few suggestions to help you handle workplace bullying in your organisation.

Make sure you have all the information

Before you jump in to try to resolve the situation, it’s important to make sure that you have a complete understanding of the issues involved. It’s a good idea to speak to other co-workers who may have witnessed the alleged bullying and find out whether there are any underlying problems which may have contributed to the situation.

If you try to take further measures without having an accurate picture of what is happening, you could end up causing further conflict and making the situation worse. If you have a personal relationship or work closely with either of the parties involved, it may be worth taking a step back and asking HR or even an external investigator to help you.

Before taking further action you will need to evaluate whether the behaviour can be defined as bullying or whether it falls under a different category such as sexual harassment or discrimination. Sexual harassment and other forms of discrimination require a different disciplinary approach to bullying.

Minimise the risk of continued harm

Once you have evaluated the situation, the next step is to take short-term measures to prevent the behaviour continuing. It may take a while to come to a full resolution so in the meantime you may want to consider reassigning tasks, granting leave or taking steps to ensure that the parties involved have minimal or no contact.

Decide whether the matter can be resolved

If the bullying isn’t too serious, it may be possible to resolve the matter internally with a no-blame conciliatory approach or disciplinary measures for the person found to be doing the bullying. In more serious cases, you may need to conduct an in-depth investigation, especially if someone could potentially lose their job over bullying allegations. .

If you decide on a resolution, it’s important to make sure the person being bullied is happy with the outcome. They may wish to deal with the situation themselves first by asking the person doing the bullying to stop, and you can offer them support in this.

As an employer, it’s important that any actions taken are well documented. If your management and employees haven’t undergone specific workplace bullying training it is well worth considering. Anyone who may have to deal with bullying incidents should be aware of the legislation surrounding workplace bullying before they escalate an issue or take action themselves.

Content retrieved from: http://www.wiseworkplace.com.au/_blog/WISE_Blog/post/how-to-handle-workplace-bullying/.