interview techniques
Considering Cognitive Interviewing or Conversation Management?

In carrying out workplace investigations, even the most seasoned investigators can grapple with selecting the right questioning techniques to use in particular circumstances. Choices can depend upon such variables as the nature of the alleged workplace problem, the character and cognitive make-up of each witness, and the amount of background information available to the investigator. In this article, we take a look at two valuable interviewing techniques: cognitive interviewing and conversation management. It can be demonstrated that proper use of these techniques will markedly heighten the quality and accuracy of the information collected. And such an outcome of course has significant repercussions for the standard of evidence that can be effectively incorporated into future actions.

Cognitive interviewing – a massage for the memory

In the early 1990s, psychologists Fisher and Giselman began to assist law enforcement officers to more effectively interview witnesses. Prior to this, the standard interview technique in police work was producing mixed results. It seemed that a fairly rigid investigation plan with conversation killers such as closed-ended queries and leading questions tended to taint the information gleaned. Utilising a number of techniques from psychological practice, the cognitive interviewing technique began to be introduced during witness questioning. Central to this was the desire to spark the memory in a way that would generate the most detailed and accurate data. 

Reinstating the context and enabling visualisation techniques can assist witnesses to recall past events. Simple strategies such as allowing the witness to close their eyes, draw a sketch, or think about their emotional state at the time the events occurred all aid memory recall. “Tell me everything that happened” may seem basic, but unless we explain the conversational rules at the start of an interview, we can’t expect a witness to automatically give us this information. Asking for the witness to go backwards in time also has the proven ability to jog the memory. Consciously going through key events in reverse order can have a sharpening effect on the memory, as the witness must set aside any rote story and concentrate more closely upon the details. Cognitive interviewing is all about finding open and creative ways to generate better recall. 

Conversation management – the careful testing of doubts

One challenge for any workplace investigator is when open-ended techniques such as cognitive interviewing don’t appear to be working on a witness. Sometimes, despite utilising all available resources to heighten recall, hardly any useful information will be obtained. In such instances, conversation management can prove an effective way to reduce blocks and gaps that might occur in the interview. The existence of these frustrations – known as resistance – can tempt the workplace investigator to simply presume guilt. Surely, if a witness keeps resisting certain questions or appears to have gaps and inconsistencies during the interview, then they have something to hide? Or must be somehow dodgy? 

The danger in jumping to such conclusions is that the quality of the evidence drawn from the investigation might be irrevocably tainted by presumptive questioning. And the Briginshaw principle reminds us that evidentiary quality will be a key determinant of whether the balance of probabilities has been met. The beauty of the conversation management method is that it can assist in shedding light upon any doubts, in a way that is fair and respectful of the witness. The model combines open-ended questions with a framework for probing detail, enabling thorough examination of the account. It is important to bear in mind that gaps, oddities and behaviour changes might in fact be related to something other than deception, such as cultural differences, or trauma related to the incident. Conversation management provides research-backed techniques for getting to the bottom of any unclear or uncertain material.  

Widening our investigative toolkit

These two techniques – cognitive interviewing and conversation management – provide two different yet equally valuable tools for investigators to draw upon when conducting a workplace investigation. With no two humans alike, we will inevitably hit a brick wall or two when conducting our interviews in the workplace. Yet it pays to have a clear investigation plan for dealing with such eventualities, rather than winging it. If a witness becomes visibly confused, flustered or appears extremely uncomfortable in the process, then pushing on regardless might elicit low-quality material. With these and other proven questioning techniques in our investigative toolkit, we can certainly feel better equipped to delve into the vagaries of witness accounts. 

 WISE Workplace provides investigative interview training for HR managers and workplace investigators. Dates for 2015 are out now. 

Content retrieved from: http://www.wiseworkplace.com.au/_blog/WISE_Blog/post/considering-cognitive-interviewing-or-conversation-management/.