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WISE Workplace is a multidisciplinary organisation specialising in the management of workplace behaviour. We investigate matters of corporate and professional misconduct, resolve conflict through mediation and provide consultation services for developing effective people governance. 

Through the delivery of professional development opportunities and self published practitioner guides, we are the centre of excellence for the ongoing professionalisation of workplace investigations across Australia.

The Latest from the Blog

Inside the Fair Work Commission: How it Operates

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Most employers and employees are likely have at least some contact with the Fair Work Commission (FWC) during their working lives. 

This might be as simple as obtaining information about award conditions and employee rights, or as contentious as appearing before the FWC in a workplace dispute or unfair dismissal matter.

So how does the Fair Work Commission work?

The basics of the fwc

The FWC is the national workplace relations tribunal. Created by the Federal Government, it is an independent body that oversees a range of employment-related matters.

Its members are independent office holders who are appointed by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Federal Government. Members work in a panel system, which aims to ensure that matters are heard by members with specific expertise in the relevant area. 

The FWC is not to be confused with the Fair Work Ombudsman, whose role it is to enforce compliance with the Fair Work Act and associated legislation, as well as provide advice to employers and employees on industrial relations matters. Unlike the FWC, the Ombudsman cannot conduct investigations or hearings.

what matters does the fwc deal with?

The FWC has the right to make decisions on a wide range of employment issues, including:

  • Determining minimum wage and working conditions
  • Hearing disputes in relation to unfair dismissals or other disciplinary actions
  • Making decisions in relation to appropriate industrial action
  • Conducting and facilitating alternative resolution methods in relation to general workplace disputes and workplace protections  

When making decisions, the FWC is required to take into account factors such as:

  • The principles of equity and good conscience
  • An assessment of the merits of the case before it
  • Avoiding any type of discrimination in the workplace, whether that be sexual, religious, disability or age based, to name a few

how to get a matter heard before the fwc

In order for a matter to be heard by the FWC, an appropriate form needs to be submitted in accordance with the applicable Fair Work Commission Rules.

In certain circumstances, such as when conducting reviews into awards or wage reviews, the FWC is empowered to launch its own action. 

fairness a key focus of hearings

The FWC is obliged by legislation to facilitate reasonably swift actions, and operate informally - without resorting to complicated legal concepts which could make it difficult for the ordinary worker to participate in proceedings. 

One of the central tenets of the FWC requires that hearings be conducted impartially and fairly. During hearings, the members are required to determine the facts and make decisions based on the information put before them. Ultimately, the main purpose of a hearing is to facilitate dispute resolution between the parties. 

Can the FWC dismiss an application? 

An application may be dismissed outright by the FWC in circumstances where it is:

  • Frivolous or vexatious
  • Contrary to the applicable legislation
  • Doomed to fail
  • Clear that one of the parties has unreasonably failed to attend hearings or comply with orders or directions of the FWC. 

What the FWC can't do

Despite being a quasi-legal body, the FWC is not entitled to provide legal advice, or assistance.

It is also not permitted to act in a partisan fashion by representing any particular political party. It must focus on impartial and objective decision making.

Do you need assistance in dealing with the FWC?

WISE Workplace is highly experienced at conducting investigations into allegations of workplace misconduct across government, education, not-for-profit and private sectors. 

We are proud that none of our decisions have been challenged by the FWC. If you are looking for assistance to navigate the challenging issues of workplace misconduct, we provide investigation services and training - Contact WISE today.  

Stand By Me: The Role of the Support Person

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, February 28, 2018

For an employee who is on the receiving end of disciplinary action, performance management or a workplace investigation, it is an upsetting, and even a potentially traumatic experience. 

Every employee involved in such a process is entitled to have a support person present during any meetings or interviews. 

A failure to afford an employee a support person can result in the process being deemed a breach of procedural fairness, and the outcome may be declared invalid upon review.

what is the role of a support person?

The role of the support person in any interview or meeting is to provide moral and emotional support, ensure that the process is fair, and to assist with communication - they are not required, or permitted, to act as an advocate, put forward a version of events or make an argument on behalf of the employee.

While support persons are entitled to ask some questions about the process, it is crucial that they don't respond or answer questions in terms of the substance of the matter, on behalf of the employee. 

A person engaged as a translator cannot generally act as a support person at the same time.


Only in certain exceptional circumstances the employer can refuse to have a specific person sit in as a support person. 

These circumstances include where the requested support person:

  • Holds a more senior role in the organisation than the person who is conducting the interview - thereby creating a risk of undue influence or pressure by the support person on the interviewer;
  • Could be disruptive to the process or has their own agenda (such as a former employee or somebody who is known to be on bad terms with management or the executive);
  • Is involved with the subject matter of the investigation or may be witness to some of the events. A person who is involved in the investigation in some way cannot be seen to be neutral and it is not desirable for a potential witness to have access to the respondent's evidence. 

Although employers may be able to object to a specific support person who has been requested, they are required to advise employees of their right to select a different person.


When determining cases of unfair dismissal, one of the factors the Fair Work Commission considers is whether the employee was unreasonably denied the right to have a support person present during any interviews. 

Best practice for employers

To ensure best practice in disciplinary or investigative processes, the following steps should be undertaken:

  • Employees must be advised of their right to select a support person for any relevant meeting
  • Employees must have the opportunity for the meeting to be organised, within reason, at a time when the support person is available
  • The support person must receive a clear explanation of their role - that is, to provide moral support only. 
  • The employer must take into account any additional considerations that could apply, such as those involved in an Enterprise Agreement or similar negotiated agreement with the employee. 

Offering employees a support person to attend any meetings and interviews related to disciplinary action, performance management, or workplace investigation with them, is crucial to the fair outcome of these processes. 

For more detailed information on conducting interviews, you can purchase a copy of our book Investigative Interviewing: A Guide for Workplace Investigators. If you're conducting a workplace investigation and need assistance, contact WISE Workplace today.  

Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Organisations are no doubt aware of the need to comply with anti-discrimination legislation, but actively encouraging cultural diversity in the workplace is becoming increasingly important - it can offer potential benefits far beyond simple compliance with the law. 

Let's take a look at some of the benefits, and how organisations can manage cultural diversity. 

THE definition of cultural diversity

According to Diversity Council Australia, cultural diversity is "the variation between people in terms of how they identify on a range of dimensions, including ancestry, ethnicity, ethno-religiosity, language, national origin, race and/or religion".  

Having a culturally diverse workplace simply means that you employ staff with a range of different backgrounds.

why is cultural diversity important?

Staff members from a variety of cultures offer different perspectives, knowledge and experience, which can be very valuable to organisations. 

Some of the benefits of cultural diversity include:

  • Thanks to the internet, many businesses now have clients spread out across the globe. Having a culturally diverse staff can help facilitate stronger relationships with these clients, potentially providing a competitive advantage and even boosting market share. 
  • Having a variety of different backgrounds and experiences in your workforce can encourage innovation and 'out of the box' creative thinking and decision making. 
  • Fostering a tolerant, inclusive workplace is important from an employee point of view - staff are likely to be happier and more productive working in an environment where it is clear that everyone is respected for their differences.
  • A diverse and inclusive workplace can also help attract and retain top talent. 

So how can organisations manage diversity?

 Some tips for managing diversity include:

  • Celebrating regular diversity days to recognise and support differences in your employees. However, it is important to be aware of cultural sensitivities, and avoid the appearance of tokenism. 
  • Creating policies that support an inclusive environment for people from a range of cultural backgrounds and set out what behaviour will be regarded as discriminatory or prejudiced. 
  • Communicating these policies to all staff members.
  • Imposing penalties in circumstances where inclusion policies are not being followed. 
  • Making sure that those in management positions set a good example for inclusive behaviour.
  • Being clear about what each staff member is accountable for, so everyone is treated fairly. 
  • Offering all staff training in cultural awareness and understanding. This could take the form of seminars or workshops, and perhaps including first-hand accounts of what it's like to be from a particular cultural background. 
  • Ensuring that the business has some flexibility to fit in with cultural needs. For example, a business with a high number of Muslim employees may wish to offer a prayer room, or those with Indigenous members of staff may wish to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land prior to formal meetings or events. 
  • Being flexible enough to allow employees from different backgrounds to take time away for important religious and cultural rites.

Research has found that business performance improves when employees feel highly included and think their workplace is strongly committed to supporting diversity. 

If your workplace is having issues with managing diversity, WISE Workplace provides a number of services to assist you, including cultural surveys and mediation.


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