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WISE Workplace is a multidisciplinary organisation specialising in the management of workplace behaviour. We investigate matters of corporate and professional misconduct, resolve conflict through mediation and provide consultation services for developing effective people governance. 

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The Latest from the Blog

To Disclose or Not to Disclose

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, October 10, 2018

For many employees, one of the most difficult aspects of navigating the modern workplace is deciding whether to disclose a mental health issue.

Not every employee is required to be open about their condition, and there is often a fear of the potential consequences for their career if they are. 

We take a look at when an employee is obligated to disclose, what employers must do, and the pros and cons of disclosure. 

what does the law say about the employee's responsibility? 

When dealing with mental illness in the workplace, employees are not required to share details of their condition with employers unless there are legitimate concerns that it may affect their ability to perform their role properly. 

For example, employees who operate heavy machinery but are struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction or are reliant on certain types of medication should advise their employers, so that they do not risk their safety or that of their colleagues. 

Failing to share this information could mean that the employee is in breach of their obligations under Work Health and Safety legislation.

what must employers do?

Commonwealth legislation determines that it is unlawful for employers to discriminate against their employees for a variety of reasons, including discrimination on the basis of a mental health condition. 

According to the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth), employers cannot act in a discriminatory fashion towards employees based on past or future conditions, temporary or permanent conditions, or actual or imputed disabilities. 

Types of discrimination which employees with mental health conditions may face include:

  • Direct discrimination, for instance when a candidate is not hired or an employee is disciplined inappropriately because of their mental health. 
  • Indirect discrimination, for example requiring all employees to eat lunch in the staff lunchroom - which for instance might cause difficulties for employees with anxiety. 

Choosing not to make adjustments for an employee who is struggling with their mental health is a form of discrimination. 

There are also obligations on employers around disclosing an employee's mental health status to others in the organisation. All employment relationships include an inherent requirement of confidentiality, which means that employers are prevented from discussing or disseminating information about their employees' mental health. 

Exceptions can be made in circumstances where the information must be shared in order to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to the life or health of the employee or as required by law.

pros and cons of disclosure

Workers who don't have an obligation to disclose often struggle with the pros and cons of sharing this information with their employers and co-workers. 

A clear advantage of disclosing this information is that colleagues are aware of the circumstances under which the employee is operating and can provide a level of social support. Managers who know that a team member is struggling with mental health issues may well be more sympathetic, and can assist by providing more flexible working arrangements, lessening workloads in times of crisis, or otherwise ensuring that the workplace is generally accommodating of the employee's needs. 

Further, ill-founded rumours or gossip may be avoided by an employee being open about the difficulties they are facing and could help de-stigmatise mental health issues in the workplace. 

Disadvantages include sharing very private information with colleagues, which may be disseminated to other people in the organisation and have the potential to result in harassment or discrimination. This may be particularly relevant in circumstances where the mental health condition is temporary or does not affect the ability of the employee to perform their duties adequately.

mental health and wellbeing in the workplace

Employees can contribute to good mental health at work by:

  • Taking care of themselves
  • Avoiding known triggers
  • Participating in exercise
  • Taking regular breaks during the work day
  • Staying up to date with any medication 
  • Relying on a support network (both inside and outside work)
  • Avoiding external influences like excessive alcohol or drugs. 

If you would like more information on mental health in the workplace, check out our series of articles on Mental Health in the Workplace. WISE Workplace can also assist employers with drafting and implementing policies relating to mental health disclosure.  

Job Stress, or Psychological Injury?

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, October 03, 2018

Being aware of job stress, and proactive about its potential effect on staff and their ongoing mental health, is an important component of ensuring employee satisfaction and OHS in any business. 

But it is crucial not to confuse job stress with a psychological injury, which may or may not have been caused by the work environment. 

the difference between the two

A psychological or mental disorder includes a range of cognitive, emotional and behavioural symptoms which ultimately interfere with an employee's functioning and can significantly affect how they feel, think, behave and interact with others. 

This is to be contrasted with job 'stress', which can be better described by referring to physical and emotional symptoms arising in work situations. 

For example, an employee who is experiencing conflict with their manager and feels mildly apprehensive about working shifts with the manager, including feeling physical symptoms such as a slightly increased heart rate or perhaps perspiration, is likely to be suffering from job stress. 

An employee who has sustained a psychological injury may well experience 'stronger' symptoms more commonly associated with a diagnosis of anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder arising from their interactions with their manager. 

Examples of psychological disorders

Psychological disorders can generally be grouped into three types: mood disorders (such as depression or bipolar disorder), anxiety disorders (including anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder), and psychotic disorders (such as schizophrenia or borderline personality disorder). 

There is a wide spectrum according to which the severity of any condition can be assessed, and simply because an employee has been diagnosed with a condition that is generally perceived to be 'serious', such as schizophrenia, this certainly does not preclude them from being fully functioning members of your team. 

early signs and symptoms of psychological disorders

It goes without saying that the signs and symptoms of a psychological disorder differ depending on the type of injury. Although far from an exhaustive list, some symptoms could include:

  • Depression: significant changes in behaviour including difficulty concentrating, drinking more alcohol as a means of self-medicating, lack of energy, finding it difficult to manage tasks which were previously easily handled, increased absenteeism. 
  • Bipolar disorder: extraordinary levels of energy, dramatic change in personality in the workplace, struggling to meet reasonable deadlines, and symptoms of depression (when the employee is 'down')
  • Anxiety disorders: unusual irritability, anxiety attacks, excessive worrying about workload or specific tasks.
  • Schizophrenia: demonstrated suspicion of co-workers, 'odd' ideas or erratic behaviours, talking to themselves. 

Tactful and considered interventions are encouraged in circumstances where employers, managers or HR initially begin to notice signs of distress or job stress.

Although intervention and assisting an employee in seeking professional assistance can in some cases possibly prevent symptoms from deteriorating, and the employee from developing a full psychological illness, this should only be undertaken by qualified and sympathetic staff. Care also needs to be taken to maintain the privacy of the employee at all stages of the intervention process. 

how is a psychological injury diagnosed?

Only an appropriately licensed medical practitioner, such as a psychiatrist, psychologist or general practitioner should diagnose a psychological injury. It is anticipated that, if required, this medical practitioner will either prescribe appropriate therapy, pharmaceutical relief or both. Further, that practitioner should also conduct a 'capacity for work' assessment, if this is required before the employee is able to return to their usual duties. 

With appropriate support, even employees with significant psychological injuries or disorders should be able to continue working. Of course, this will require support from the employer in ensuring that potential 'triggers' are avoided as much as possible. 

Key determinants in assessing whether employees with psychological injuries are able to continue working include an assessment of their interpersonal functioning with their co-workers, the risks to the personal safety of any other employees, and the potential side effects of any medications. 

Our article Mental Health in the Workplace offers more information on mental health issues. Contact us to find out how we can assist with the trickier aspects of ensuring that your staff are as healthy, happy and productive as possible.

Mental Health in the Workplace

Vince Scopelliti - Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Making sure that your staff are fit and healthy, enabling them to perform their duties at an optimal level, forms an essential part of being an employer of choice. But beyond ensuring that your staff are physically capable, it is essential to also look after their mental wellbeing. 

Underestimating the importance of mental health in the workplace is likely to have lasting impacts on your workers, your business and clients. 

OHS legislation requires employers to provide a safe and healthy work environment for all workers, which does not cause ill health or aggravate existing conditions.

In a series of articles, we'll examine the impact of mental health issues in the workplace, how to take appropriate steps to support staff suffering these conditions, and how you can promote mental wellness in your organisation. 

WHAT IS mental health?

Mental health is about emotional, psychological and social wellbeing. For an employer, this means keeping an eye on whether your staff are struggling to keep on top of things inside and outside of work, and taking steps to assist them with dealing with any difficulties that may be impacting their productivity. 

There are many types of mental illness, including depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, personality disorders (such as borderline personality disorder), bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

the scope of the issue

According to the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC), around 45% of Australians aged between 16 and 85 will suffer from the symptoms of mental illness at some point during their lives. In any given year, one in five adults will deal with a mental illness. 

Some workers will commence their employment already suffering from symptoms of mental illness, while others may develop their mental illness while at work. 

In many cases, the mental illness will develop separately from circumstances in the workplace. In others, a negative or "unhealthy" work environment will contribute to staff developing mental health issues or may exacerbate underlying conditions. 

Some factors which can contribute to poor mental health in the workplace include job stress, poor workload management or unrealistic deadlines, poor communication, bullying and an overall lack of support.

the impact of poor mental health

Research shows that the cost to business of failing to pay proper attention to mental health is significant. 

The AHRC reports that workers compensation claims relating to stress and associated mental illnesses cost Australian businesses $10 billion every year. The failure of businesses to recognise the potential impact of mental health issues and failure to implement preventative or remedial measures such as early intervention, has been estimated to cost over $6.5 billion per annum. 

Absenteeism due to mental illness is another issue, with an estimated 3.2 days lost each year per worker. 

The difference between job stress and psychological injury

When it comes to identifying mental health issues in the workplace, there is a difference between work stress and psychological injury. 

Psychological injury includes behavioural, cognitive and emotional symptoms which have the potential to significantly impact a worker's ability to perform their job and interact with co-workers. 

This can be distinguished from job stress, which is generally a reaction to a specific situation which can be resolved, and is not a standalone injury.

To disclose or not to disclose 

In some circumstances, it is important for employees to disclose their mental health status. This is particularly the case if they are taking medication which could affect their ability to perform their usual employment, or if there are general concerns about safety or interactions with other staff. 

An employer has an obligation not to discriminate against staff because of their physical or mental attributes, including their mental health.

Managing and supporting mental health in the workplace

Employers can provide support by having guidelines in place for how to talk to a worker who has disclosed that they are suffering from mental health difficulties, and how employees can adjust to dealing with a colleague with a mental health issue. 

It's also essential for employers to know how to address performance concerns involving employees who are experiencing mental health struggles, without discriminating or taking ill-considered disciplinary steps.

Creating a safe and healthy workplace for all

This starts with non-discriminatory employment practices and implementing long-term strategies to promote a healthy culture and a positive workplace where staff feel they are making a meaningful contribution to an overall goal, are supported and happy to come to work. 

It's also important to create direct services to assist workers with mental health issues who require support and adjustments in the workplace. According to the AHRC, every dollar spent on identifying, supporting and managing workers' mental health issues, yields nearly a 500% return in increased productivity. 

It is highly likely that at least one worker in your workplace will, at some point in time, have a long or short-term mental illness. While you do not need to become an expert in mental health, having a better understanding of what mental illness is (including its possible effects on a worker) enables you to be more effective in handling issues that may arise.  

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